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Want to get in to IT.

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by cHk4, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Hello all well I have been posting in other sections in regards to doing a Microsoft Certificate. I am going to be doing one in programming. I know this will not guarantee me a job in IT, but I have always wanted to be a programmer so that’s my career goal ( well to program robots but that’s another story :P )

    any way I have no IT jobs under my belt. I do sort all the IT problems at work and what not but that’s not really a IT job!

    Now how difficult is it going to be for me to get in to IT? Below is my current CV, I have not done any thing yet to it in regards to the help offered on these forums that is still to come but I just want a honest opinion on how hard its going to be. I know each situation is different but well just want some opinions please.

    Any advice or critisism welcomed :)
    There are bullet points but it has lost the formatting :(
    Thanks,
    Thor.
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  2. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Do you have any informal programming experience? I've known programmers who did the traditional "computer science degree" route and ones who've gotten jobs just because they've been playing around with programming languages for years (usually since about the age of 13 or so) and just knew their stuff.

    The first thing I'd do is lose the grades. Unless things are very different in the UK than they are in the US, no one cares about your GPA (unless you graduated cum laude or something).

    You say your ultimate goal is to program robots which is fine and well, but where are you looking to start? The common point of entry for IT is some sort of support position; either tier one phone support or PC tech desktop support. Neither one has any direct relationship to programming, but they are a foot in the door.

    In the mean time, if you haven't been studying programming as yet, start. Some people begin with a bit of web programming using JavaScript but I've heard that Python is another good language to start with (and it's a much higher level language).
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  3. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Just go to google, set country to UK and search for Robotics degree.

    You will probably have to start by building your own if you want to program robots.

    I wouldn't reccomend the industry route as you are likely to end up in the instrumentation and control industry which is probably not the exciting robot related field you wanted.

    There are some openings for good programmers without experience to program robots in industry but a degree would certainly help.

    Why the interest in robots ?
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  4. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Thank you very much for your reply. Would honestly say my current informal programming experience would not be good enough to do that as of yet. Hopefully after my Microsoft Certificate is done I will know a bit more.
    Ok I will loose the grades, tbh I don’t think any one really cares about them lol :D

    I would be more than happy to start in some sort of support position as you said to get my foot in the door. You have to start somewhere!

    Thank you once again for your reply it is appreciated
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  5. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    I must admit your advice got me on to this. Doing a search for open University I found a 10 week program for Robotics and the meaning of life. Which doesn’t start until Oct. One of the best ways it seems from reading to get in to learning about Robotics is to get this Lego Set where you can program the CPU.
    Thanks for your advice also, like I said before I love the idea of programming application, software and robots as a goal :P
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    A friend of mine bought the Lego Mindstorm kit, ostensibly for his nephew, and demonstrated it to a group of us.

    I can well see why this is a good intro to robotics. It was great fun!

    To be good at robotics requires some maths, as you have to understand servos and feedback and the like.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  7. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Nothing wrong with lego, its probably one reason why I became an engineer. :biggrin

    Theres also many kits you can buy off the internet, and hobbyist sites etc.

    Then theres the Robosapiens and the various hacks for them.

    The maths is not that hard, look into Control Theory.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  8. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Thats the one! Seems like there is a lot you can do with these kits. I am really good at math. Well from what I can remember dont really use math now adays :D
    Like I said my dream job would be to program robots but I would be more than happy doing applications and so on and keeping robotics as a hobby. Doesnt seem like to many help desk (new starter type roles ) in my local area :(
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  9. nekky

    nekky Bit Poster

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    hi CHk4,

    Generally I have noticed that alot of jobs for programming either focus on your academic background (usually a 2:1 minimum degree in Computer Science or maths, not necesarily with industrial experince) or your Experience (commercial or otherwise). So you really either have to be really good or have an academic background that indicates(although not always true) you have a strong ability to learn.

    Like dmarch said, I also think you are probably best doing some self study on the basics of programming to start off if you have no programming experience, to get a feel of what its like to speak in codes.

    I dont know much about programming for robots but you will need to do some research on which languages are involved in doing this type of programming and get practicing, before dedicating your time and money to a full time course. If you decide to go the course route, it would also be a good idea to start building up your portfolio right from the start, so that you stand out when it comes to job hunting at the end or during your course.

    ... regards
     
    Certifications: BSc Computer Science
    WIP: 70-270, 70-290 ...for now
  10. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Don't depend on a certification program to teach you programming. Certification exams are designed to test what you already know how to do. Learn programming. You can either follow the pattern laid out by a particular cert program or us some other guide (such as a course in robotics).

    Bottom line is whatever type of programming you're leaning towards, you'll still need to learn the foundations of general programming first. The best way to learn is to do. Start writing code at your every opportunity.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  11. nekky

    nekky Bit Poster

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    Regarding your CV, I honestly think it needs some improvement. It is a good idea to do some research either here or on google to get an idea of what other people's CVs look like, and other people's comments on those cvs.

    I would suggest that you get straight to the point when talking about your past experiences intead of a story format as it makes it difficult to get an idea of you past experience from a glance (Which is the amount of time agencies give CVs when scanning for keywords).

    Also words such as "very", "excellent" and "good" are used too often.
     
    Certifications: BSc Computer Science
    WIP: 70-270, 70-290 ...for now
  12. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Thank you very much for your feedback, I will have a play and search when I get home.

    Thanks once again tripwire :)

    ---
    By the way I know what I quoted was posted by nekky but saying thanks to tripwire :P
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  13. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Fella

    Your CV doesn't look too bad (though you can't get too much of an idea of aesthetics froma forum post). Its always going to be a problem not having experience - the IT industry is probably worse than most other professions, but this would be true to some extent regardless of what field you're looking to move into.

    Everyone's CV is laid out differently - but mine has never caused me problems and I haven't changed the basic layout in ten years.

    I put the obligatory personal info at the top of the front page, then list my technical skillset, followed by a brief few headings detailing my personal attributes, then move onto experience with main higjlights on the second and third pages - finishing up with interests right at the end.

    I'd agree with Nekky - there's no sense in you over-egging the puddign with a load of superfluous waffle about how great you are - limit the superlatives and focus on the facts :)

    Oh and one more thing - unless you want absolute dumploads of spammage, I'd remove your email address and real name from the CV...
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  14. Bambino1506

    Bambino1506 Megabyte Poster

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    Hi mate.

    Hope this doesn't cause offense but wanted to give you my honest first impression of the CV you posted, it looks daunting to me and I think needs to be cut down in volume and seperated into bullet points for job experience etc....

    Hope that helps and keep us posted.
     
    Certifications: MCP,MCDST,MCSA
    WIP: CCA
  15. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    First off, robotics involves a lot of theory regarding AI, kinematics, etc. It's a non-trivial topic that should not be looked into until you have the proper foundations. Way back before I went to university I was thinking of taking a computer science and cybernetics degree at Aberdeen, but changed my mind. I personally prefer cybernetics to robotics because of its close relationship to biomechanics.

    Anyway, back to topic. There is something that confuses me about your aspirations: you are interested in robotics, yet you want to take Microsoft certifications that have nothing to do with the field? How do you expect certs to fulfill you interest in robotics? Robotics will take degree study in the field if you wish to make a career out of it.

    Only take the MS programming certs if you wish for your career to progress in IT. :)
     
    Certifications: BSc(Hons) Comp Sci, BCS Award of Merit
    WIP: Not doing certs. Computer geek.
  16. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Are you are interested in Control Systems and AI? The two are becomming interelated to create new adaptive control systems.

    For AI this looks interesting its from the same guy who wrote Creatues
    http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/scienceandnature/0,6121,1178630,00.html

    For control systems japan seems to be leading the way with fuzzy logic. Fuzzy control. They have even created a system that can stabalize a helicopter with one of the blades off. The US military is also developing similar stuff for fly by wire.
    http://www.fuzzy-logic.com/Ch2.htm

    and heres a toy just for fun...

    http://onemansblog.com/2006/09/23/remote-controlled-heli-fun/
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  17. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Wow you really are so helpful. I do thank you so much for your time when replying to me always helpful so thank you once again mate :) that helicopter looks cool :D Had a quick look through the Fuzzy logic that’s quiet cool and makes a lot of sense.
    ---
    Thanks zebulebu for your advice on the CV(and saying it doesn’t look too bad :P.) And your input.
    ---
    Thanks Bambino1506 too, no offence at all. Would prefer the truth :) Will work on getting my CV a bit more presentable and easier to read.
    ---
    Thanks also Mathematix,
    I must admit that’s what I like about robotics the theory regarding AI etc, I mean it may end up just being a hobby.
    I think I will leave that for the time being. However it is something which really interests me.
    I must admit it is a bit confusing saying I would love to do robotics yet I am doing Microsoft Certifications. I want to get in to programming, software etc. But when I get to grips with that ( in years to come! ) then branch of and learn robotics, like you said and I thank you because I was un aware that it would take a degree in that field ( kind of obvious but thanks for informing me. ) I was planning on getting in to the basics doing a open university course then progress that way.

    Thank you every one once again, will try and make my CV better and post it :D

    Also going to take out my personal details now :oops:
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  18. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Ok sorry about putting the wrong one up here is the amended CV front page

    the Ÿ is a bullet point by the way :D
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS

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