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VMware Fusion - 2 machines, can't ping each other

Discussion in 'Virtual Computing' started by hailstorm, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. hailstorm

    hailstorm Bit Poster

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    I'm a little baffled. I have 2 machines running in VMware Fusion. Mac OSX and Mac OSX Server. I'm trying to follow along with the exercises in the Server Essentials book I have. Neither machine can ping each other. The Network adapter in Fusion is set to 'host only' so the two machines should be able to talk to each other.

    The server is set to the following:

    IP: 10.1.17.1
    Sub: 255.255.0.0
    Gateway: 10.1.17.1
    DNS: 10.1.17.1
    Domain: pretendco.com

    The client is set to the same except the IP address is 10.1.17.2

    In my Network preferences I have 'Parallels Host-Only Networking Adapter' set to 10.37.129.2 and 'Parallels Shared Networking Adapter' set to 10.211.55.2

    Could anyone point me in the right direction for getting this working?
     
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  2. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Class B subnet? :blink
     
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  3. hailstorm

    hailstorm Bit Poster

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    Yeah I thought it was a little odd. Changing it to class C makes no difference though.
     
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  4. Gingerdave

    Gingerdave Megabyte Poster

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    is the server set to provide dhcp?
     
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  5. hailstorm

    hailstorm Bit Poster

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    Nope. Both are set to manual IP. No DHCP running on the server.
     
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  6. nugget
    Honorary Member

    nugget Junior toady

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    You won't be able to do much with a class B subnet on a class A network, and changiong it to a class C subnet mask won't help either.

    Class ranges

    Class A 0 0.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255
    subnet mask 255.0.0.0

    Class B 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.255.255
    subnet mask 255.255.0.0

    Class C 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.255
    subnet mask255.255.255.0

    Class D (multicast) 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255
    subnet mask not defined

    Class E (reserved) 240.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255
    subnet mask not defined
     
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  7. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    What do you mean by won't be able to do much with that combination of subnet and network?
     
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  8. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    There's no DHCP -so IP addresses have to be set manually.

    The IP address for the first client is 10.1.17.1. In addition, the Default Gateway is 10.1.17.1 and the DNS is 10.1.17.1

    These are all class A addresses therefore a Class A subnet mask should be used, not a class B or C.

    Qs
     
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  9. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Using a class B subnet makes his network address 10.1.0.0 with host range 10.1.0.1-10.1.255.255

    no?
     
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  10. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    No. The 'network address' (host IP address) would remain the same - 10.1.17.1

    No. The host range would be 10.1.0.1 - 10.1.255.254 (as 10.1.255.255 is the broadcast address for the subnet! :p)


    The networking adapters are outside of the available range allowed. If the subnet mask was set to a class A then everything would be fine. By using a class B it's just complicating matters.

    Qs
     
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  11. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    So what your saying is that there isn't actually a problem with the ip addressing though?

    the 255 was a typo - and by 'network address' i wasn't referring to the host address.
     
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  12. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    I'm no VMware expert but here's the basic principle (please correct me if I'm wrong):-

    • You combine (or bridge) a current network adapter connected to your computer to a 'virtual' adapter inside the VM.

    • Virtual networks are then set up against these 'virtual' adapters.

    • These virtual networks are what your virtual hosts are created on.

    • If you specify an incorrect subnet mask when configuring the hosts (or you set up the virtual network to be restricted to a specific, incorrect subnet) then they won't be able to see the adapter, therefore won't be able to see the network, and therefore it doesn't work.

    Side note - There's nothing wrong with the basic IP addressing - you can use a class B subnet for class A hosts if you like; it'll just restrict the amount of available host IPs.

    It's good practice to keep it simple though, and having a class A subnet would be the best option here.

    Qs
     
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  13. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    I was just questioning this as a previous post said that using a class b mask with class a network wouldn't let you "do much"

    using that ip addressing however he has 65000+ host addresses in that subnet, more than enough i would of thought.
     
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  14. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Yep - 65536 to be precise (including broadcast and network addresses)

    Nugget was probably referring to the problem at hand though, and not giving out incorrect generic information.

    Qs
     
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  15. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    sorry dudes gotta back the guy up here

    the 'network address' and the 'node address' are seperated by the subnet mask

    whilst the first octet 10 (thats decimal not binary) is indeed a class A address range
    you can use a /16 or /24 mask, hell even a random one if you like

    this is part of a technology called Classless Inter-domain Routing (CIDR) and works with all but the most archaic technology, the specific tech in play is Variable Length Subnet Mask, back in the old days the protocols checked the first few binary bits and made an assumption as to the subnet mask, most new technologies don't do that, they actuall check the subnet to do the math themselves

    in this example the 'network' part of the address would be
    10.1

    the 'node' part of the address would be
    17.1
    and
    17.2

    this is perfectly acceptable

    I'd say it could be a problem with the Fusion networking

    you have mentioned Fusion then mentioned 'Parallels Host only' setting, this confuses me :)
    I have just rebuilt my mac and dont have fusion on it yet, let me get it up and maybe I can be of more use
     
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  16. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    you need not apologise lol
     
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  17. hailstorm

    hailstorm Bit Poster

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    As far as I can tell it's what Fusion calls the virtual network adapters that it installs. I am running OSX leopard client in Fusion using a hack so it isn't officially something that is supported. I wouldn't have expected it to stop networking from working correctly though.
     
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