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Virtual Vs Physical some questions.

Discussion in 'Virtual Computing' started by Gingerdave, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. Gingerdave

    Gingerdave Megabyte Poster

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    To a certain extent I understand the positives to do with virtual computing, but I am still a little fuzzy on implementation of things and the benefits vs a physical network.

    This is basically a follow on from the Workgroup vs Domains thread which got me thinking that setting up a domain is something I want to do and so it comes down to the implementation and the relative (de)merits of each option.

    As I understand it a virtual network is just that, when you want to use it you spool up the network do what you need to do, make it fall over then fix it etc etc. However as this is only on when you need it do you miss out on all of pluses of having an active domain like the user logon, additional security and so on where as a physical one would have these on always.

    Which brings me to the quandary do I implement a Virtual domain or a "real" domain? and do you guys have any tips for me either way.

    Many thanks
     
    Certifications: A+,MCP, MCDST, VCP5 /VCP-DV 5, MCTS AD+ Net Inf 2008, MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  2. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Hiya Dave,

    I guess that would depend on what equipment/technology you would use in your physical network compared to the virtual one.

    If you are going to get a couple of desktops and use a *normal* switch to connect them all up, then i would say stick with virtualisation.

    If you are talking about machines connected via managed switches, to a *real* server with UPS, back-up tape drive and a hardware firewall to the outside, then yes.

    Don't forget how expensive electricity is these days if that is the plan!

    Simon
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  3. Gingerdave

    Gingerdave Megabyte Poster

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    To be honest I was planning on using a couple of desktops and running the switching via a wireless Ap/ come router that I have kicking about, and then building from there.

    But you reckon at that point virtual would serve me better?
     
    Certifications: A+,MCP, MCDST, VCP5 /VCP-DV 5, MCTS AD+ Net Inf 2008, MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  4. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I'd say so - you'd have to sort out wireless authentication straight away for a start.

    I would get a good spec desktop, load it up with RAM, fast drives and get Virtual PC (or VMWare - budget allowing) installed.

    Lot cheaper on the 'lecy too!
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  5. Gingerdave

    Gingerdave Megabyte Poster

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    I think the desktop should handle it, will likely need a hdd for it though. do you recommend VMware or Virtual PC for the task?
     
    Certifications: A+,MCP, MCDST, VCP5 /VCP-DV 5, MCTS AD+ Net Inf 2008, MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  6. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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  7. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    If you don't want to pay to get the workstation on vmware, then get the vmware server edition as its free.
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
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  8. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

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    I find studying with actual computers easier than using virtual machines. The action of walking over to a machine and back I find helps with seeing in your minds eye what is going on where.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCP, MCSA:M 2003, ITIL v3 Foundation
  9. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Depends which way you look at it. Someday you might have to manage machines you can't see or walk too!
    :D
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  10. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    When I practice I use a VMware lab that I setup. It's a domain with a few servers. Keep in mind like Boyce mentioned that if you're going with vmware, virtual pc, etc you would want to have a pretty decently powerful computer so that it can handle the vmware when you have multiple workstations running at the same time.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
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  11. Gingerdave

    Gingerdave Megabyte Poster

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    Thanks for the replies.

    My current desktop is:

    AMD Dual Core 6000
    4 GB Ram
    160GB SATA Seagate barracuda
    ATI 1650 512mb Ram
    Running on dual monitors.

    Would that have enough grunt to do the job? :blink Either way I was going to by another hdd to hold the info on.

    I will have a look at them both. I support remote machines/users now so I suppose it wouldn't really be any different.


    Thanks for all the advice.
     
    Certifications: A+,MCP, MCDST, VCP5 /VCP-DV 5, MCTS AD+ Net Inf 2008, MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  12. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Dave,

    Sounds good enough to me - assuming you are running XP Pro on the host, you have the maximum amount of RAM.

    Let us know how you get on.

    Simon
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  13. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

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    The company I work for has 26 sites across the UK and 3 data centres. Its not that often I actually see a physical server, 95% of my server admin is done through Remote Desktop or a HP ILO. The closest data centre is on the other side of the city. I do use virtual machines at home, along with my two trusty old test computers. I just found it easier with two physical computers to conceptualise what process was happening where back when I first started using Server 2003 for my 70-290. With virtual machines its all happening on the same box. Both ways have their merits, I just think starting with physical boxes helped me to see what was going on, its then easy to translate that to virtual machines.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCP, MCSA:M 2003, ITIL v3 Foundation
  14. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Fair comment. I think anything which helps people understand the concepts worth while.

    Simon
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT

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