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venting, advice - what to do

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by morph, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. morph

    morph Byte Poster

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    So about a year ago i got a job as a junior network support bod, i didnt have any qualifications, my background was general helpdesk, but was somthing i wanted to do - get a career.

    Now a year into it - i initally took my network + about 8 months ago and passed, then 3 months later i had to do a ccna - i got the ccent but failed the icnd2 by about 12%. More and more in my job i'm being given stuff to do which is way above whats in the ccna - i'm being asked to do it - works so stressful, its got to the stage where i'm really not looking forward to coming in in the morning. There's also lots of politics in this office which makes life alot harder - i think i either took a bigger bite than i could chew or they over estimated what i was capable of - bottom line is i feel like i'm treading water everyday - and being in networks aint much fun when u dont knw what the hell's going on as everything stops with you. If i could go back to the helpdesk job i had i would, mainly out of the fact i have no issues with pride, in terms of taking a step back - i can still take two forward in the future - i'll still want to follow networks but at the moment its all a bit much...anyone got any advice on this - i'm thinking of trying to get a differant helpdesk job and then when i feel a bit more confidant then move for networking again - thoughts ?

    Also - anyone who thinks getting a ccna means **** loads of cash and eays days at work for doing a 5 day course - believe me...it couldnt be further from the truth ;)
     
    Certifications: Network +, ITIL Foundation, CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: server/ccna security
  2. TimoftheC

    TimoftheC Kilobyte Poster

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    Sorry to hear that Morph, it's not easy when you are unhappy at work :(

    The first thing I would say is office politics can get real ugly, just try and rise above it and don't get involved, hopefully people will get the idea and leave you out of it, although that's not guaranteed - depends on the culture in your office.

    The other thing I would say is that your employer appears to have invested in your career and training already, maybe it is worth sitting down and talking with your manager/supervisor and explaining that you are struggling in some areas and could do with a bit of support and/or extra training. It could be your employer thinks your doing a fine job and coping well - they won't know what's going on if you don't tell em.

    Finally, reminiscing about old jobs and how much you enjoyed em is an easy thing to do - I do it all the time. However, we often quickly forget the bad points that made us want to leave em in the first place and trying to recapture it can be a mistake.

    Personally, I would chat with my employers, explain how I feel and see what they say. If they don't listen or are unsympathetic then screw em, look for something else.
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+
    WIP: MCDST???
  3. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    My advice would be on a similar level to what TimoftheC has already said. Talking to your current employer is the best way to go and then you can express how you're feeling.

    If they're very unhelpful and not considerate then I'd suggest looking for something else, but they should be understanding.

    Talk it out with them.

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  4. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Sorry to hear that, Morph. But I thank you for the testimony (repped!)... your words better illustrate the wisdom behind taking an IT career one step at a time far better than anything we could say.

    Help desk to network administration is more than just a step up... it's THREE steps up, if you consider that most techs go from help desk to desktop support to server admin to network admin. It can be done... but as you've seen, it's not easy. You are quite correct that there's no shame in taking a step (or more) back to solidify your foundations, because you can take many steps forward in the future. The steps forward don't have to be all at once... as long as you eventually progress towards your goal.

    You've been at that job a year, so if you switch jobs, it won't look too bad - not like if you had gotten into a job and two or three months later decided to bail. On your CV, it'll look like you stuck it out for a little bit, which is good.

    You can certainly talk to your employer... but if he's only got network support positions available, it's not like he can do much other than slow down the pace he's throwing new stuff at you. That *could* possibly work... if he would give you time to digest what you're doing before something new is thrown at you, ya know? Or perhaps they can provide you some more training without the stress of having to do "fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants", "throw-you-into-the-deep-end" training on a live production network.

    Regardless of which decision you decide to make, you will likely do what you think is best, not only for your career, but for your happiness and sanity as well. After all, if you don't enjoy what you're doing... why do it? I wish you all the best in this situation.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  5. morph

    morph Byte Poster

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    thanks for the advice guys, i hear what your saying boson, but i'm not the network admin - i am properly at the junior level (thank god) - but sometimes i feel like i'm getting it and doing stuff thats sort of ccna level, then othertimes things r just over my head, i feel i've come along way in a year, but still seem to spend most days being confused :)

    the worst thing about it is - i moved from helpdesk within the same company to junior network support - same money and terms - more work, and get this - everyone on the heldpesk earns more than me - although to be honest that didnt bother me at the time i just wanted the exposure, also we have alot going on at the moment, were doing a WAN migration, Installing SAP throughout the company - changing all our internal and external firewalls and changing our proxy and doing normal support and project work - my colleague has had to go from watchguards > to cisco asa's > to junipers in about a month - and were useing all 3 at the moment - :blink - the principles the same just differant ways of doing it!

    suppose i could give it more time...although i think i might have a chat with the sneior network guy, as he's a good mate - also spent all day on one project today trying to sort a problem out - the two senior guys i work with couldnt work it out - the manager (who knows nothing about networks) asked me to take a look - sometimes its like the blind leading the blind!
     
    Certifications: Network +, ITIL Foundation, CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: server/ccna security
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Still, junior network administration is still network administration... three steps up from help desk. I feel for ya, man...

    Well... that's why salaries aren't typically discussed amongst employees... jealousy and bad feelings ***always*** happen... someone always feels screwed in the deal.

    If you're happy with what you're doing, then the salary really shouldn't matter, provided you're paid fairly. But you don't seem to be happy.

    There's *always* a lot going on in network administration. What you describe is similar to what I experienced on a daily basis, both as a consultant and as an in-house network admin.

    Yep, it'll be that way at times. But hey, perhaps you're simply too hard on yourself, and demanding too much of yourself. If your manager is happy with how you're doing, don't let it stress you out. The exposure you are getting is ***priceless***, if you can hang on and absorb the knowledge. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. Naive

    Naive Byte Poster

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    Great Post MB :thumbleft

    I agree with everything, It's such a shame that you've been launched off a diving board with bricks tied to your feet (lol I found that funny sorry) but as mentioned by MB the exposure you're getting is full on! I definitely agree with talking to your manager, and just express that you really want to do well but in the same light that you're struggling a bit, see if you can negotiate something with him where he can maybe allow you to soak the knowledge in and get your feet warm.
    I really, really do hope you can get used to it and start to feel comfortable in the position, best of luck with everything mate and get back to us about how your talks with manager went, what you plan to do next etc
     
    WIP: MCDST
  8. morph

    morph Byte Poster

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    gonna have a proper chat with my boss over the next few days, spoke to my mate the senior - and he said i'm doing fine - and he thinks i should have been given a break from projects - and here's a nice little one for peeps who think they get a ccna and its plain sailing (i'd like to add i never did - if you can be arsed read my previous posts from months ago) - as of 5:30 this afternoon when the other senior guy failed his retake - i'm the most qualified person o paper in the department...its all about experience..;)
     
    Certifications: Network +, ITIL Foundation, CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: server/ccna security

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