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Ubuntu has entered the building

Discussion in 'Linux / Unix Discussion' started by Fergal1982, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Well, my 5 (count them - 5) ubuntu packages arrived today. each package contains the install CD and the live CD. Just been playing about with the Live version right now. seems quite cool really. quite slow, but then considering its loading from CD into RAM that isnt too bad.

    I am quite liking what i see so far. think i will have to install it on my second machine as a dual-boot, giving me two xp pro, and two different versions of suse.

    Fergal
     
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  2. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Good stuff Fergal!

    Ubuntu is by far the easiest version of Linux that I've played with.

    8)
     
  3. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    thanks.

    ummmm two different versions of linux. not suse. :lol: although suse is one of those.
     
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  4. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Let us know how you get on with your Linux experiences, Fergal. :)
     
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  5. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    nice little feature of the live CD (no idea if the others do this) is that is opens the cd drawer and asks you to remove the disk before it powers down the machine.
     
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  6. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Wait until you install it properly, it flys!
    Let us know how you get on :thumbleft
     
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  7. Pady

    Pady Nibble Poster

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    hehe i was greedy and got 10 packs through and gave a load out to the guys at work.

    Ubuntu is a very nice OS to play with and have it running on a virtual machine on my box at home so that i can get to grips with a different OS before i go for the full jump and switch fully.

    Also looked at the SuSE OpenSource which also seems to be a nice OS to play with.
     
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  8. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    I got my CD's a few days ago. I got the 32 and 64bit versions and Mac version all with the live and install included. Overall good value for nowt...:D
     
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  9. mojorisin

    mojorisin Kilobyte Poster

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    Right downloaded both the Live and the Install versions last night and i have just finished installing it on my laptop


    Looks very similar to mandarke linux if i remember right seems pretty quick although i dont really have a clue what to do with it

    One issue i had when installing was that the drive previously had been formatted ntfs so when it came to setup the drive it gave quite a few options and although it is running i feel as though i should have partioned the drives different but wasnt sure how to do it

    ie boot, home, swap etc

    any tips would be great

    cheers
    Mick
     
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  10. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Mick, I let Ubuntu do the default partition. I'm sure you can tinker with the sizes of the partitions after it's been installed.
     
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  11. mojorisin

    mojorisin Kilobyte Poster

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    it came up with about 5 options so i selected the erase disk and use free space one


    now when i save stuff it defaults to the desktop as my home folder

    need to figure out how to move the folders/create file structure .....whatever :blink
     
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  12. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Your problem isn't Ubuntu, it's Firefox. By default, Firefox downloads everything onto your desktop automatically. Here's what to do to change it.

    Open Firefox
    Click Edit
    Click Preferences
    Click Downloads
    Click the "Ask me where to save every file" radio button.

    Once you do that, everytime you download something using Firefox, you will be prompted to choose a location. Usually, people download everything into a folder in their home directory.

    As far as moving things around, if you are using X-windows (GUI) and you have your home folder on your desktop, you can drag and drop items on the desktop into your home directory just like in Windows.

    It's a little different on the command line. One thing to remember is that your desktop is in the
    Code:
    Desktop
    directory in your home directory.

    Open a terminal session and at the prompt type:
    Code:
    pwd
    You should be in your home directory and the "pwd" command (print working directory) will tell you where you are. Assuming that you are in your home directory, you'll see something like this:
    Code:
    jmpyles@tripwire:~$ pwd
    /home/jmpyles
    jmpyles@tripwire:~$
    To find your Desktop directory, type:
    Code:
    ls -l | grep Desktop
    Make sure you capitalize "Desktop" since the Linux command line is case-sensitive. You'll see something like this:
    Code:
    jmpyles@tripwire:~$ ls -l | grep Desktop
    drwxr-xr-x   3 jmpyles jmpyles     4096 Dec 12 10:29 Desktop
    jmpyles@tripwire:~$
    This shows you that Desktop is in your home directory and that it is a directory (as opposed to a file).
    Enter the Desktop directory by typing:
    Code:
    jmpyles@tripwire:~$ cd Desktop
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$
    You are now in the Desktop directory. Type:
    Code:
    ls -l
    to see the contents. You'll see something like this:
    Code:
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$ ls -l
    total 16
    drwxr-x---  3 jmpyles jmpyles 4096 Dec  2  2004 Downloads
    -rwx------  1 jmpyles jmpyles  160 Jun 20 09:54 ethereal.desktop
    -rw-r--r--  1 jmpyles jmpyles    0 Dec 12 10:50 movefile
    -rwx------  1 jmpyles jmpyles  154 Jun 13 08:54 putty.desktop
    -rw-r--r--  1 jmpyles jmpyles 3878 Nov 24  2004 starthere.desktop
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$
    Let's say I want to move the file "movefile" from the current directory to my home directory. Here's what I'd type:
    Code:
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$ mv movefile /home/jmpyles
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$
    Notice that after I pressed Enter, the cursor came back and no message was displayed. To make sure that "movefile" is no longer in the Desktop directory where you are currently located, type "ls -l" again.
    Code:
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$ ls -l
    total 16
    drwxr-x---  3 jmpyles jmpyles 4096 Dec  2  2004 Downloads
    -rwx------  1 jmpyles jmpyles  160 Jun 20 09:54 ethereal.desktop
    -rwx------  1 jmpyles jmpyles  154 Jun 13 08:54 putty.desktop
    -rw-r--r--  1 jmpyles jmpyles 3878 Nov 24  2004 starthere.desktop
    jmpyles@tripwire:~/Desktop$
    Notice that "movefile" is not listed. To get back to your home directory, just type "cd".
    After you do that, type "pwd" to make sure you are back in your home directory (typing "cd" without any arguements will take you back to your home directory, regardless of where in the directory structure you happen to be located).
    Now that you are back in your home directory, type:
    Code:
    ls -l | grep movefile
    -rw-r--r--   1 jmpyles jmpyles        0 Dec 12 10:50 movefile
    jmpyles@tripwire:~$
    You'll see that you have just successfully moved "movefile" from your Desktop directory to your home directory. Hope that helped.

    EDIT: Forgot to mention that the process of changing your preferences in the Firefox download manager are somewhat different if you are running Firefox on Linux vs. Firefox on Windows. Above is the "Firefox on Linux" instructions.
     
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  13. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    ive discovered a minor downside of ubuntu. whilst installing ubuntu i tried to enter my standard username (firstname.lastname) but it refused to accept it. typing only my first name resolved the issue though, but that doesnt bode well for network use.

    Now, if only i can work out how to utilise the USB network connection...
     
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  14. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Just finished installing Ubuntu. I have some niggles with it already.

    1. only boot loader option was Grub
    2. Seems to have some problems if you arent on a network
    3. it didnt ask me for an admin password. so i have a standard username and password, but no root password - if anyone can advise what this is supposed to be that would help matters.

    Fergal
     
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  15. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Found the answer
    http://www.ubuntulinux.org/support/documentation/faq/root

    Thats ever so slightly annoying to be honest, especially given that if i type the sudo command i get an error stating 'unable to lookup gethostbyname, or some such error.

    all in all, not off to a great start i must say.

    Fergal
     
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  16. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Have to use "sudo" instead of being able to use the "su -" command to switch to root kind of threw me, too. You can use sudo on Debian too in order to let end users to execute selected commands as root. Great way to let a user have just enough root access to do their jobs but no more.
     
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  17. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    man this just gets worse and worse. on booting i get an error stating that it cant connect to either gnome or ubuntu (funny that, since theres no network cable) and that it will cause ubuntu to not work correctly.

    If i try to go into networking in the system\administration\ menu, it seems to be loading, but doesnt actually LOAD anything. so i cant even attempt to disable any network connection it thinks it should have.

    I think im going to reinstall this shortly, and if it doesnt work after that, its going in the cupboard. I understand this is a young distro, but if you have this much problems just installing it on a standalone machine then its got a long way to go.

    sigh
    Fergal
     
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  18. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Much as it pains me to do so, I'd suggest at this point that you go to the Ubuntu forums and ask about this there. Here's the link:

    http://www.ubuntuforums.org/

    Chances are, this is a known issue and they'll have it sorted in just a few minutes. It never occured to me to install ubuntu as a stand-alone because so much Ubuntu/Debian functionality is downloaded and installed from apt mirrors after the initial install is complete.
     
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  19. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I think this is an issue with specific NIC's. I had it happen once with a Debian install. The install worked great while connected to my home lan, but when I took it to the customer's place of business where they didn't have a lan it wouldn't even boot. I pulled the NIC and the system booted fine. I placed a different NIC in the machine and it worked fine whether or not there was a network cable hooked up or not.

    I can't remember what NIC it was that was troublesome, but that's the first thing I would look at.
     
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  20. SamuelClyde

    SamuelClyde Nibble Poster

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    Ive been running Ubuntu new for a month or so (After having played with Mandrake, Fedora Core and Gentoo)

    Ubuntu is by far the easyest to use out of all the distro's I've used, I ordered about 20 Copys of it, Hand them out to friends etc.

    I was running x86_64 Copy of Ubuntu, but promptly moved to x86 as the benifit of using the whole of my 64bit Cpu didnt really show up, Plus alot more support for x86.

    The Ubuntu Forums are THE place if you have any problems what so ever, Half of my setup is configured with help from there =) (Specially getting the drivers for my 7800GTX Hehe)
     
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