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Traditions

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by tripwire45, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    This is a spin off from the "Tis the Season" thread down in "Forum Announcements". I thought it more appropriate to put this in "The Lounge". Since we're rapidly approaching the "Christmas Season", I wanted to ask everyone about what traditions they hold to.

    This isn't strictly about "Christmas versus Channakah versus Kaanza (sorry about the spelling)", but a wider practice of traditions in your lives. What activities provide meaning and structure to who your are and what life means to you?

    Your responses don't have to include just annual traditions. They can be any tradition, regardless of its time frame. Just talk about what adds dimension to your life...whether its religious or secular.

    I'm not trying to foster arguments or pitting one tradition against another. Also I personally have my own ideas of "right" and "wrong", I'm not trying to say that any one tradition is better than another here. I just want to see who we are as a people...we meaning the members of this forum...our community.

    I won't start out the discussion by posting my traditions at this time. Fear not...I will, but I want to let some others have first go. I'll be back to throw my hat in the ring along with everyone else.

    So...tell us about your traditions.
     
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  2. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    OK, this is clearly gonna be a big one (as opposed to any of the more "light-hearted" subjects we flit around). But we're big people here at CertForums, so lets take this one seriously. I'm happy to be first (after Trip) to throw my hat into the ring ....

    I was brought up Roman Catholic, 2nd child of a mixed-religion marriage (ie Mum RC, Dad Protestant). So my elder brother is Protestant, I'm Catholic. You can imagine the fun that caused in the West of Scotland (which has more than a hint of sectarianism about it, for those that don't know)

    My education was through Protestant schools - no real hassle. But around the age of 14-16ish, I decided that none of what I was seeing/hearing in terms of religion was making any sense to me, so I consciously (and controversially) ceased to practice it in any way.

    Except that now, I fully believe I am a christian person (note small c), that is fully aware of morals, of right v wrong. My family are the same (my wife is Protestant, non-practising). I am happy with that.

    I probably am a hypocrite, as we celebrate Christmas with great joy, yet not attending a religious service. But I am fully aware of what Christmas is all about, and as this Thread will hopefully go on to cover, not just for the Christian faith, but ALL faiths. I like to hear about Chinese festivals Muslim festivals, Jewish festivals, etc, etc.

    My daughter comes home from school telling us about what other celebrations are occuring around this time of year. I think that is 100% encouraging and healthy. I love when she does it.

    I enjoy Christmas - I think I'm right to do so. But that's me.

    (Pheew !!!)
     
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  3. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    Wow Gav try and match that. Well for what it's worth here's my 2 penneth worth.

    Myself and my wife are both non-practicing christians but we have both been baptised into the C of E. Both of our children have been baptisedin to the church as well. Both of us work in a school, myself in a public school and my wife in a state primary school. Therefore we both get time off at Christmas. We all enjoy Christmas esp as the chldren are still young (12 & 9) and always celebrate it on our own and as a family. It is something we have always insisted on, a day together as a family. Doesn't happen too often in this busy world.

    This year we will do the "family thing" as we always do (tradition?) and visit parents for a couple of day. We all enjoy this as it makes the Christmas holiday that little more special seeing all of the relatives.

    As Gav said the kids are always coming home and saying that it is the "whatever" festival this day/week/month. I think that it is great that they learn about all the other faiths and beliefs. However, there is always one grumble. Last year we went to the candle lit service at the local church and the kids did not know any of the popular carols or even the Lords Prayer!!!

    Other traditions, as trip said this was not just about with Christmas, we always try and eat together on a Sunday, we go out for a posh meal on our wedding anniversary.

    Cheers everyone

    Andrew
     
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  4. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I was hoping to generate a bit more traffic on the subject but apparently, it is not particularly interesting. Since I promised, I have to say that our traditions aren't always "religious" nor centered around the month of December.

    We don't do this one too often because the kids are often out and about on Friday, but in Jewish tradition, on Friday evening at sundown, we like to celebrate the coming of the sabbath (shabbat). This includes the lighting of the shabbat candle and the blessing over the bread and wine in Hebrew followed by a scruptuous meal. Afterwards, we sing songs and play games that involve the whole family.

    Of the Jewish feast, like most people, I probably enjoy Passover the best. It's a great time to take time off with family and friends, have a great meal and, through the Haggadah and aspects of the eating themselves, recall the Exodus journey when Moses led the people out of the land of Egypt with the miracles of G-d.

    My kids have the tradition of "movie night" It is usually (but not always) hosted at their friend Jeff's house. Each movie night is a triple feature and always has some sort of theme. The movies can be only PG-13...no R or X rated movies allowed since the kids that attend come from a variety of "family value" types including some fairly conservative ones.

    One tradition that I miss was celebrated when we all lived in Southern California. On Sunday afternoons, we'd go over to my sister-in-law's place and I'd barbecue hamburgers or chicken or whatever. We'd all have a great feast (so many of my traditions involve eating for some reason) and relax. The kids were young then and after the meal and some relaxing, we'd have them put on an impromptu talent show. I could be anything they could come up with in 5 or 10 minutes and was usually pretty funny.

    That's kind of what I had in mind by "traditions". It doesn't have to be "Christmas". "It doesn't have to be "the church". It can be any activity that is near and dear to your heart for whatever reason. Stuff like that.
     
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  5. Phil
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    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    Well, I was bought up C of E but apart from weddings and funerals I haven't been to church since my early teens so I guess you could say I'm not a practicing Christian :) I was dragged up in lots of different corners of the world, met many different people of many different faiths and like to think this has left me with a live and let live attitude to the world, I don't hold any particular beliefs but if other people do that's fine by me as long as they don't want to inflict them on me. I really only have one tradition which is going to the parents over Christmas. They own a village shop which is open 364 x 7 x 14, my brother and mother work there and my dad works away so the only day we really get to spend together without any disturbance is Christmas day, which we spend down the Pub together then home to fall asleep in the Turkey :D
     
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  6. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    That reminds me of one of our traditions...

    Christmas eve usually involves meeting up with a few mates who have all moved away from Darvel, but we all get back together in the Local for a few.

    But on New Years Day, my Dad, brother and me, and loads of family friends climb the nearby Loudoun Hill (small, easy climb, but great hang-over cure). That's then followed by a few :morebeer - which is a great way to just chat with the family, and look back over the year, and forward to the next.

    Then, around dinner time, or shortly after, all seems to become all blurry ...
     
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  7. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Maybe someone can help me with the distinction between a "pub" and a "bar". Having never been to the UK I have to say I've probably never been inside a pub before. There are places called "pubs" here, but I can't swear to the authenticity of them compared to their name sakes on the other side of the pond.

    Although I've been in bars before, I can't say that I've ever spent a day in one. When I used to go to bars, it was at night, either after work, or on a weekend evening. It never would have occurred to me to go to one during the day or to spend a lot of time there.

    When I delivered mail, on some occasions I'd have a bar or two on my route. It's reallly wierd to go into a bar at eleven o'clock in the morning and see people there drinking. Actually, "see" is something of a misrepresentation since it's so dark, I usually have to stand still for a few seconds to let my eyes adjust to the low light levels.

    The people inside are mostly older men. The places usually stink of booze, cigarettes, and sweat. I get in, drop the mail, and get the heck out as fast as I can.

    I can only imagine that a pub is a different place in terms of it's scope and atmosphere. Maybe some of you can enlighten me on this. :scratch :confused3
     
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  8. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    The Oxford English Dictionary couldn't have defined "pub" better, Trip :)

    You did however, miss out, the horse-racing, footie, dominoes, fighting, etc, aspects, but you've still pretty much nailed it :alc

    That's probably at the lower end of the scale - you're average "drinking den". Things do improve (depending on your standards) further up the scale, as you reach bars, restaurants, wine-bars, etc (they usually involve taking a "Missus" with you )

    But I'm sure I'm not alone in saying that one thing you do not want to be mentioning is (gulp) Theme Pubs :!: :evil:

    When "Cheers" first started getting shown over here - you couldn't move for so-called "Cheers Bars". Nowadays, just ask about Irish Theme Pubs .....
     
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  9. Phil
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    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    Trip, I've been wondering how to answer this but I think Gav has done a good job.

    Booo Hissss :sickL Stick to the local, mine's probably been there since Nelson were a lad, the building has so much character it could be a stand up comedian, no music and serves a decent Pint.... heaven.... now then where's me flat cap the whippet needs a walk.
     
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  10. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Thanks, Phil - I knew all that hard research work would pay of in the end 8)
     
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  11. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    I cannot even find the word to backup Gav and Phil's comments about theme pubs. SHUDDER. They are the boil on the backside of humanity.

    I do have to admit to going to a Weatherspoons place (For trips benifit a pub/bar but very cheap drinks) for a couple, but only on the way to catch the bus or to celebrate/ drown my sorrows after an exam (it is just next to the bus station).

    IMO

    Andrew
     
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  12. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Yup, I think we'd all deff grant Weatherspoons joints special dispensation, AJ.

    Purely functional Boozers, always near the train or bus, and usually used for meeting, celebrating or commiserating (all of the above as swiftly as poss!!!)

    But as for the latest Paddy o'Flanerry McPannery o'Donnell McGinty's Genuine Oirish Whisky Bar - SHOOT ME NOW !!! :evil:
     
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  13. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Wow. The "pub" tradition is definitely one that a lot of people relate to. Thanks for the feedback, everyone. :)
     
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  14. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Did anyone envisage this Thread changing from deeply-held theological beliefs and traditions, to one of definitions of what Boozers are, and what we as a multi-cultural mixed bunch are prepared to put up with ?

    Somehow, I think we all know the answer to that already...

    Aaah, it's the CertForums feeling :alc

    :peace :D
     
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  15. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    :morebeer I'm tempted to say "I'll drink to that" but I'm afraid it would send the wrong message.
     
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