1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Total beginner to MCSE

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by MrHanky, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. MrHanky

    MrHanky New Member

    7
    0
    13
    Hi everybody.

    I've recently started a self study for a MCSE with Advent training and i'm concerned that some of the subject matter is harder than i expected at this early stage of the course. I've used Mac's for over ten years now for graphic design but never realised how little i knew about the workings of it etc....
    understandably the course will only get more complex and i fear i will have a large bill at the end of the Two years and nothing to show for it.

    Am i 'thick' or has anyone else experienced what i'm going through??

    Plus is there any advice or encouragement you can give me?

    P.S. I'm just about to encounter 'Protocols'
     
    Certifications: BA Hons
  2. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Welcome to CF, glad you found us.
    Advent advertise in my local paper every week but don't give a web addy!
    You are right about MCSE. It would be like a first year medical student expected to carry out a heart transplant.

    Best of luck, hope Advent provide you with good support. :)
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  3. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    Nope. You aren't "thick". What you are experiencing is the reason I think the vast majority of training providers are guilty of fraud. It takes a fair amount of knowledge of PC's, servers, and networking to even begin an MCSE.

    As far as advice goes.... Well, I'd say go back and study the basics of how PC's work, of networking, TCP/IP, etc.... I started studying those concepts a year before I started my MCSE, and I still found it a difficult accomplishment. I have books on all the foundational subjects.

    If you don't have a computer lab, set one up. Do everything hands-on. It's the only way to really "get it". You'll need at least a couple of servers, and two or three workstations. They don't have to be expensive. They just need to be powerful enough to run the OS's. I have only one computer that has a cpu faster than 1 ghz, but they all have at least 512 megs of ram.

    You can get evaluation copies of all the OS's you'll need. You will just have to rebuild your lab completely every three months because the evaluation copies have time limits. That's usually not a problem because if you play around with things the way I did I'd have things so thoroughly broken at first that I rebuilt my servers and domains more often than that anyway. You can only really learn this stuff through practice, trial and error, and just "getting your hands dirty" with it, so to speak.

    The way you are doing things is the hardest way there is, and by that I mean going into Windows and Windows networking bascially "cold". Your Apple experience will help you some, but you're going to have to learn a different logic and way of doing things: the way Bill Gates does things.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  4. The_Geek

    The_Geek Megabyte Poster

    772
    13
    64
    Aye, without a fair amount of hands on experience, getting your MCSE (or MCSA for that matter) will be very hard indeed. As everyone else has already stated, you'll need some form of lab setup at your house. A few older pc's and some eval hardware will suffice.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA and Micro$oft
    WIP: PDI+
  5. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

    13,493
    179
    287
    Greetings MrHanky. Welcome to CertForums. :)
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. MrHanky

    MrHanky New Member

    7
    0
    13
    thanks for the advice.

    You're right about fraud. One of the main sales pitches in their brochure is that the course is suited to 'beginners' and claim I will be MCSE qualified within 15-19 months. At this rate i'm doubtfull i will even be a MCP by that time.

    What kind of job would be a good entry into IT to help speed this difficult time, Or do you have to have some qualifications to get any kind of job. i.e it would be easier to get the gist of things in employment.
     
    Certifications: BA Hons
  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    Without at least some background in IT it is extremely difficult to get that first job. If you can find some type of volunteer position is the next best thing.

    I'm sort of curious as to what they give you for study materials. Which of the exams did they start you off on? Which MCSE are you working towards? MCSE 2000 or MCSE 2003?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  8. MrHanky

    MrHanky New Member

    7
    0
    13
    The study materials they supply are computer based training by a company called NETg, books and other stuff i pressume. I've only been doing it a few months. There are also several workshop days through various parts of the courses, and all exam fees are included in the price.

    There was no exam to start with and the aim is MCSE server 2003.

    7 exams in total
     
    Certifications: BA Hons
  9. MrHanky

    MrHanky New Member

    7
    0
    13
    Thanks for the advice anyway, even though i now feel even more doubtful i've made the right career choice.

    maybe i should have joined the circus after all. I hear there is great demand nowadays for FREAKS.

    Anyways, my X-box is calling my name and i must obay.

    chat soon.

    laters
     
    Certifications: BA Hons
  10. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    Mr. Hanky,

    Don't feel like the Lone Ranger in this. There are a lot of people who have been taken in by the training providers. These guys seem to be just completely unscrupulous, so you aren't the first one to have a really bad experience with one of them.

    I'm curious, did your training provider ever point you towards this page, or did you ever go take a look at the Thompson Net g products yourself before you started?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  11. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

    9,915
    60
    229
    Welcome Mr Hanky - hopefully we can help turn around your confidence to do this. Good luck :)
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  12. Sandy

    Sandy Ex-Member

    1,091
    2
    65
    Hi

    From an old hand that came late into the certs game. The MCSE / MCSE is hard you will need to give up a social life for at least 12 months in order to gain the quaifications you seek in the time scales that your training company are suggesting.

    Put the X-box away get out your study manuals and get down to it. Otherwise wave bye bye to the cash you have spent with the company. I may sound hard but if you really want to be an MCSE YOU need to start working.
     
  13. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

    6,199
    125
    199
    Welcome to CF Mr Hanky! :biggrin

    It sounds like you are going to have a lot of work to do over the coming months so good luck to you.

    Remember to ask any questions you are struggling with here.

    :)
     
  14. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

    6,773
    102
    221
    Welcome to the forum :D
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCSA (messaging), ITIL Foundation v3
    WIP: Looking at doing ..................
  15. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    I agree Sandy!!

    From the link Freddy provided I found this...

    Who should become certified as an MCSE on Windows 2000

    The MCSE on Microsoft Windows 2000 credential is appropriate for IT professionals working in the typically complex computing environment of medium-to-large organizations. We recommend that an MCSE on Windows 2000 have at least one year of experience implementing and administering a network operating system.

    That is straight from the horses (Microsoft's) mouth.

    The salesman selling these courses are not always making this clear to people. If you don't fall into this category, you are going to find it really tough, especially when you get past the first couple of exams because they are easy in comparison to how tough the going gets as you move forward.

    This doesn't mean it is impossible because it isn't, it just means that if you don't want to waste your money, you will have to start doing the things already mentioned in this thread. All spare time must be spent studying, for there is a plethora of stuff to learn before you.

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  16. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    Hey, that's a least a $1.00 word there Bluerinse. I like it. :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  17. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    Yes I have always liked that word :biggrin

    I just need to squeeze it into the same sentence as perspicacity 8)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  18. MrHanky

    MrHanky New Member

    7
    0
    13
    Thanks for the advice. Even the stern but correct one from sandy.

    I get the impression that the majority of folk on this forum were involved in IT before attempting any certification.

    What is the usual route into this job sector? If not self study for beginners who want a better job/income. How do you get that all important 'at least one year of experience implementing and administering a network operating system'.??
     
    Certifications: BA Hons
  19. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

    6,199
    125
    199
    Can I just ask your age? If you are under 24 I think that you may be able to find out about and apprenticeship in IT, and get your foot in the door that way.

    Thats how I got started.

    8)
     
  20. moominboy

    moominboy Gigabyte Poster

    is it definitely 24 mate?

    i'd heard that most apprenticeships were for up to around 22 year olds.

    im approaching 24 next year but could possibly squeeze into one if i'm lucky, and if they accept close to or recent 24 yr olds.
     
    Certifications: ECDL
    WIP: A+

Share This Page

Loading...