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To leap or not to leap?

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by FilmoreEast, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. FilmoreEast

    FilmoreEast New Member

    Hello World
    This seems like a cheery and interesting discussion area.
    As I’m not (yet) in the IT business I suppose I’m a bit of an interloper, but here goes with my first input to the forum.
    I hope this query isn’t too much of an old chestnut but I would appreciate unbiased comments from anyone taking into account current employment market.
    To cut to the chase, I’m considering a career change into IT, probably networks and/or databases.
    Having spent a considerable number of years on avionics systems design and virtually all of my working life in various areas of the aerospace industry, this would be a fairly radical move at my advanced age ! (early 50’s), but if the employment prospects were reasonably good, it’s a move I would be happy to make and a risk I’d be prepared to take.
    I’ve spent some time investigating training options and I would probably be looking to study to MCSE/MCDBA level.
    Although, other than some time spent in programming in high level languages a few years back, I have never actually been employed in IT, I do have an interest, and I have some experience of dabbling with home PCs.
    Having graduated, albeit 30 years ago, with a degree in Physics, I don’t have too many qualms about taking on the task of concentrated study or of being able to tackle the technical aspects, but the major question is whether it will be worth the money and time spent.
    Allegedly, there are huge numbers of unfilled IT vacancies out there (UK), but trawling through various job agencies seems to give the familiar picture of experience being the prime requirement. I’ve been in contact with a number of training providers and their position (surprise, surprise) is that this is not an issue and that, with a suitable, widely recognized certification, there will be work available.
    I wouldn’t expect to go into IT employment at any elevated level, in terms of responsibility or pay, but the point is will I be able to get any work at all, with a good qualification but no experience?
    Anyway people, that’s my quandary – sorry to ramble on for so long – but any observations / comments would be welcome.
    Bye for now.
  2. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

    Welcome to CertForums, FilmoreEast. You're a tad older than most folks here but since I just turned 50 and I am a career changer, maybe I can shed some light on your query. The one factor that will make any of my comments less applicable to your's is that I'm in the US instead of the UK.

    I stepped out of my original career (which was not technical at all) about 5 years ago and put myself through university (again) to study for my IT degree. Depending on the specifics of your plan, you can expect your standard of living to go down before it goes back up, just because you'll need to take jobs that are not particularly high paying in order to get the experience you need.

    The IT career outlook seems a bit more promising than right after the dotcom crash (which was exactly the time I chose to start school again :blink ) but it's still not rosy. Depending on who you listen to, it can be downright grim. I think what ends up being the saving grace for all of us is developing a specialty that we love and that is needed. For me it was (and is) technical writing. I finally managed to get a full-time job about 6 or 7 weeks ago as the technical writer for a firm that produces a small, multipurpose networking device. I also write technical articles on the side and am working on my first, full-length text on operating system technology.

    No one can guarentee that IT or any other career path will ultimately be successful but having been around the block a few times, you can most likely leverage your previous work and life experience into new skill sets and new employment tracks.

    Again, welcome to the forum. Please ask whatever questions come to mind. Glad you made it here. :)
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  3. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

    Hi FilmoreEast, and welcome :D

    Too late tonight for me to compete with the lengths of yours and Trips' words, so enjoy yourself here, and hope to speak soon.
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  4. SimonV

    SimonV Petabyte Poster Administrator

    A big Welcome FilmoreEast, good of you to join us. Make yourself at home and join in where you can.

    Si [​IMG]
    Certifications: MOS Master 2003, CompTIA A+, MCSA:M, MCSE
    WIP: Keeping CF Alive...
  5. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

    Welcome aboard Filmore mate...
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: my life
  6. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

    Welcome to the goos ship CertForums

    "All Aboard" :biggrin
    Certifications: MCSE, MCSA (messaging), ITIL Foundation v3
    WIP: Looking at doing ..................
  7. nugget
    Honorary Member

    nugget Junior toady

    Welcome to the forum mate. All I can add is that IT is like any other job sector. It has its ups and downs.

    If you want to do it and you like/love it no matter what, and it's going to make YOU happy, then just do it.

    BTW Ice Cold VB comin' at ya *toss*
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP (270,271,272,290,620) | MCDST | MCTS:Vista
    WIP: MCSA, 70-622,680,685

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