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To Contract or not to contract

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by NetEyeBall, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    The situtation that I am in is pretty stagnant working in the NOC. Actually they took me off network troubleshooting right after I got my CCNA and put me on server monitoring. How that makes sense I have no idea.

    Now...there is a contract position in network engineering. I am not at the level they want technically, but I have good relationships, team skills, knowledge of the company, plus ability to learn and grow into the position. The group wants me up there. BUT it is a contract job of indefinate term. Meaning they could let me go next year or never.

    I will find out more information in the morning.

    Growthwise for my career, I think the experience in the network engineering postion will be fantastic and really help me stretch and grow into the engineer that I know I can be.

    But there is a risk. My current job is nice and safe, secure and boring and stagnant.

    What say you? Pay will be about the same or so I think. (Will find out tomorrow).

    Currently working on my 1st CCNP test so the engineering postion will help me with that, and help me gear toward the security firewall side of things as well.

    The technology used is bluecoat proxies, VPN, MPLS, QOS, L3 switching, VMANs, VLAN, DS3, T1 to name a few....
     
    Certifications: CCNA, A+, N+, MCSE 4.0, CCA
    WIP: CCDA, CCNP, Cisco Firewall
  2. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    One of those decision you have to make on your own.

    But FWIW and IMHO, there's no such thing as a *safe* or *permanent* job in IT these days.
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: none
  3. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    That is very true. One reason why I have thought about going back to school for a different career.

    I am going to get all the info and get a gut check and probably go for it.
     
    Certifications: CCNA, A+, N+, MCSE 4.0, CCA
    WIP: CCDA, CCNP, Cisco Firewall
  4. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    If your heart says go for it. Then go for it. Sometimes you've gotta follow the heart.

    From what I've heard, going contract can actually work for you. It tends to pay better for a start. Also, there appears to be more variety in terms of job opportunities. There are a number of things you might want to look into first though, like registering your own company and opening up a business bank account and so forth.

    We talked about it some weeks ago on this thread over here:

    http://www.certforums.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=15734
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  5. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Quoted for truth.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Quoted (again) for Truth.

    With respect to contract jobs, usually (but not always, like in Trip's case), if you're good, they'll keep you. If you're not, they'll let you go. That gives the company a little protection. After all, they've probably been burned before by employees who looked good on paper, but couldn't do the job.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    Well, NetEye is a pretty competent guy, so he shouldn't have any problems in that respect. Plus I think he said he's gonna be working for the same company with a team who already know him. Can't go wrong with that.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  8. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    I think a lot of truth has been stated and written so my two pence worth is go with your heart. In this field of uncertainty and forever learning is IT which could sometimes be probably frustrating at times. I think this is beginning to apply to other career fields as well.

    I am still hustling in IT because I love computers:D
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell
  9. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Agreed. I've met him; he seems pretty sharp. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  10. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    I've been contracting just over a month and I love it so far.

    It's a bit scary knowing that it's not safe and secure, the setting up a limited company is a pain in the a$$, I have to pay accountancy fees and get insurance (public liability), and then there's the worry of a government IR35 investigation and them actually winning and claiming a huge chunk of money from me. Not to mention the fun I'm having trying to get a business bank account set up.

    Given the choice of going back to perm- right now I wouldn't. It's a completely different feeling being a company director based on a client site as opposed to an employee in a job.

    The money is much better and you can claim tax relief on things like travel/lunch and other expenses. Because I put my websites through the company as well and I genuinely use a room in my flat as an office I'm going to claim a portion of my rent/bills and all of my broadband, not to mention my mobile phone.

    It's risk vs. reward, if you're good and professional you shouldn't have a problem finding work. A lot of it's in the mind.

    Read this first timers guide here:

    http://www.contractoruk.com/first_timers/index.html

    HTH
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  11. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    Thanks Pete!

    I am still researching...so who knows what will happen as of yet. I passed my 1st screening interview with the contact agency. The money is about the same so really the reward is a chance to be in a Security Engineering role working on networking, firewall, VPN issues. The risk is being let go.
     
    Certifications: CCNA, A+, N+, MCSE 4.0, CCA
    WIP: CCDA, CCNP, Cisco Firewall
  12. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    The same is true in all sectors not just IT.
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  13. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    I am going to stay in my current position. The thought of going in as a contractor is just a bit scary at the moment. I am going to continue studying and hopefully will find an FTE position doing it at some point.
     
    Certifications: CCNA, A+, N+, MCSE 4.0, CCA
    WIP: CCDA, CCNP, Cisco Firewall
  14. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    I thought about contracting after a few years of experience - and as you said, it seems a bit scary, but I'd plan to have 6 months worth of money saved up to cover all the bills etc. just in case I was not successful in getting one.
     
    Certifications: MBCS, BSc(Hons), Cert(Maths), A+, Net+, MCDST, ITIL-F v3, MCSA
    WIP: 70-293
  15. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Here's another benefit of having a company, become a MS partner (standard - not Gold or certified) and get all this lot for £199.

    All for internal business use and testing - registration is free and it's updated 4 times a year.

    Not bad :p
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  16. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    You don't need a formal company... you simply need to provide IT services to clients. I'm doing business as myself, and am subscribed to the Action Pack. All I needed to do was sign my own self up as a Microsoft Partner, which costs no money and has no requirements other than signing up.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  17. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    So you can set up as self employed and fix PCs on the weekend and get it?

    That's worth knowing!
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  18. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Here's Microsoft's terms:

    If you provide IT services to customers... regardless of the number of customers you have... do you not qualify? 8) I can honestly state (without feeling like I'm trying to "get around the system") that I provide IT consulting services to a few small companies that need my expertise. Thus, I qualify.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  19. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    I think I definitely qualify :tune
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging

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