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This is crazy

Discussion in 'Software' started by greenbrucelee, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    So I have established that temperature monitoring software doesn't seem to work well with Wolfdale chips, from my experience and from what I have read on the 'net'. However there are a lot of people saying Real Temp does give an accurate temperature reading.

    I have overclocked my cpu to 3.52GHz and Real temp is saying the temp is 37 degrees for each core at idle and it doesn't go above 48 on full load :blink however other software like speedfan and core temp are saying different.

    Does anyone know of either some software or hardware that could give me a definitive answer?
     
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  2. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    a thermometer?

    I think you are obsessing far too much about the temp of your CPU to be honest. It looks pretty ok to me from here. just enjoy the new processor. If it aint broke, dont bother wasting your (precious) time trying to fix it.
     
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  3. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    your probably right, I just get a bit concerned especially if its something new that has a few niggles thats all.
     
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  4. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Yep. Just relax and enjoy it. So long as you're not attempting to overclock the balls off of it then don't worry.

    The CPU has a cut off temp anyway and if you're overclocking it then you're voiding the warranty regardless so if you fry it it's your own fault.

    Read the guide to overclocking the chip that I sent you a while back and do it in stages. Increase FSB yadda yadda, stress test it.... blah blah.

    You probably won't notice a difference between your current chip speed and the overclocked speed anyway where it matters (for you = games as an example :p) so don't worry about it.

    My final advice - don't OC it until you need to.


    Yay... thread digression.


    Qs
     
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  5. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Fantastic! What a quote.

    Exactly. You've already overclocked it, so you are knackered should it ever break anyway - at least from the warranty point of view.
     
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  6. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I have got that guide printed out, I was just a bit worried I do something wrong so that's why I went with the auto overclocking function.
     
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