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The way that CCNA online curriculum has been written????

Discussion in 'Routing & Switching' started by albertc30, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    How does an Ethernet bridge handle an incoming frame? (Choose three.)

    one answer is = (If no match to the destination MAC address is found in the bridging table, the frame is flooded out all other interfaces.)

    This is in my interpretation and by the way it was written, wrong. Given all the options I would have gone for the following answers;

    1 = The source MAC address and input interface pair are added to the bridging table.
    2 = If a match to the destination MAC address is found in the bridging table, the frame is forwarded out the associated interface.
    3 = The destination MAC address and input interface pair are added to the bridging table.

    I know my 3 option is a tiny bit wrong given the question for an Incoming Frame but still the frame is flooded out all interfaces is even more wrong as it does not get flooded out all interfaces but yes it goes out all BUT the one it came from...

    Everybody here at college complains about the way this material has been written.
    I am p**** o** I lost a point here:x

    Does anybody finds tricky the way the material has been written? or is it just me an my mates at college?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  2. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    What CCNA online curriculum? There's about a blue hundred CCNA curricula out there.

    In any case, 3 is wrong because a switch will never add destination MAC addresses to the switching table.

    I don't think the problem is the way the content's been written... I think the problem is that the content's being studied by a buncha college folks who have never touched a Cisco device in the real world... which is one of the main reasons why many of us here are like broken records, constantly repeating why you should first have real-world Cisco experience before studying this stuff.

    Sorry, Albert... just my opinion.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  3. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    No problem BosonMichael and I totally understand your point of view even though I must say I disagree about having real world contact with Cisco equipment before undertaking a CCNA or any lower certification by Cisco. How can someone even know what to do with a Cisco router without the knowledge of the Cisco’s' IOS CLI?

    In my honest opinion BosonMichael if I was given a Cisco router I wouldn’t even get as far as setting it up by using the console line. I would probably be looking to set it up by using the all famous GUI which comes with all domestic routers.

    I’d probably would go further deep into the subject as this is what I love doing and learning never takes too much of any persons that wants to further themselves.

    Just before, I got an e-mail notifying me of a reply to this post as I was reading it and all of the sudden I read on the answer given by Cisco I realised one thing.

    ***(If no match to the destination MAC address is found in the bridging table, the frame is flooded out all other interfaces.)***

    In my reading I mist or neglected the "the frame gets flooded out all OTHER interfaces", given this then it is correct.

    Like I was saying, it was my way of reading the answer that lead me to my mistake and maybe and as usual not paying attention to the answer.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  4. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    That's a good question, as someone who has studyed the ccna and doesn't work with cisco routers, It has given me an edge should I use real cisco kit at some point in my career. Although I would have to read up on a great deal no doubt.

    How long were you working with cisco kit before you started studying cisco certs Michael?
     
    Certifications: MCDST | BSc Network Computing
    WIP: 70-291 | 70-293 | 70-294 | 70-297
  5. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    albertc30,

    You can review the following CCNA Exploration online curriciulum material to help you understand your confusion better:
    1. CCNA Exploration
      1. LAN Switching and Wireless
        1. 2 Basic Switch Concepts and Configuration
          1. 2.1 Introduction to Ethernet/802.3 LANs
            1. 2.1.1 Key Elements of Ethernet/802.3 Networks
              1. Page 1 2 3 4 (5)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA
  6. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    Thanks man, that's nice of you.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  7. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    About a year of basic router administration. Before that, I had gotten a couple of years' worth of exposure to other network hardware, such as 3Com switches and Watchguard firewalls.

    I'm not saying you HAVE to have that much experience... but unless you are STARTING to touch real-world Cisco hardware, it's really not gonna do you a lot of good.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    If you're in the position of needing to know what to do with a Cisco router, then you ARE ready to start acquiring knowledge of the Cisco IOS CLI. If you're just taking a class on it without any real-world router to administer... well, you're just looking at an uphill climb in front of you... and a certification that may or may not be of any relevance to what you'll be doing.

    That all-famous GUI doesn't exist out-of-the-box with "all domestic routers". Shoot, before you're able to use the SDM, you've got to actually configure the router to be able to use the SDM!!

    Learning is fine. But you're basically taking a certification preparation course - a certification that's not going to hold much weight to employers without the experience.

    Again, I will repeat, the learning is useful. All I'm saying is that it's gonna be difficult for you because you don't have experience with it.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. Septima77

    Septima77 Nibble Poster

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    In principle I agree with you Michael, but having said that I would like to add two comments:
    1- Cisco makes a very good effort to rule out so called paper CCNA's; if you do not know real world stuff, most likely you are not going to pass the test.
    2- Some people cannot land a job to get the practical experience .... and so would never be able to start the cisco course. A little case of the chicken and/or egg dilemma.
    So what do you do then? Accept the fact and become a bus driver or will you find another way to get in (never say die)... I chose the latter. Got myself the hardware, books, CBT's and study like there is no tomorrow.
    And of course a little help from my friends at this forum helps too :biggrin

    What really interests me right now: Life after CCNA; the three way conundrum.
    Voice? Security? or direct CCNP?
    CCVP is 8 exams, So is security. CCNP (only :rolleyes:) five exams.
     
    Certifications: CCNA CCNAS CCNAV
    WIP: CCVP
  10. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Although we'd hope that would be the case, sadly, it is not. It is entirely possible to pass the CCNA without real-world experience.

    Does that mean you'll understand how to do the stuff in the real-world if you can pass the exam? Absolutely not. If it did, we'd all go out and get certified and have jobs tomorrow administering Cisco kit.

    There is no chicken-and-egg, catch-22 dilemma. You might THINK there is, but there isn't. Just ask most of the network administrators on this forum.

    Experience. Or... do it your own way. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. Septima77

    Septima77 Nibble Poster

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    My way:
    Be knowledgeable, excel in what you do, love what you do, be an enthusiast, start at the bottom, keep your eyes open and work your way up. Never stop learning.
    This way you will get noticed and some people will tend to guide you as you go.
     
    Certifications: CCNA CCNAS CCNAV
    WIP: CCVP

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