1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

taking a computer to bits

Discussion in 'A+' started by Jagunco, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. Jagunco

    Jagunco Bit Poster

    40
    0
    26
    I recently inherited an really old computer from my brother and on Monday and dutyfuly ripped the bugger to pieces on my coffee table to see what the guts look like.

    It was for an hour or so very interesting and I enjoyed it more that I thought i would, also there was no fear factor of braking the bloody thing as I have no intention of reassembling it.

    I'm waiting for the same brother to give me a table he doesn't need any more so I can have a workbench in my spare/gym room and confine work to that area,

    I now have a stripped computer on my coffee table and little idea what further use to put it to. I've been looking over diagrams in books and comparing it to the mother board to get a better feel, looking at the power cords and seeing if I can idenify the different bits... am I missing anything out
     
    Certifications: You're having a laugh
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  2. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    what about putting it back together without any diagrams to see if you can, then make sure it works and if you have another PC why not network the two and see if you can copy data from one to the other.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  3. rax

    rax Megabyte Poster

    684
    12
    59
    I agree, ripping a jigsaw apart is easy, a 1year old could do it, but putting it back together? that's the real learning curve.
     
    Certifications: ITIL v3 Foundation, CompTIA Network+
  4. TimoftheC

    TimoftheC Kilobyte Poster

    408
    9
    46
    I scrounged an old p120 computer from work, rebuilt it and installed windows95 on it. I've convinced everyone else it's useful as I can practise working with dos commands on it. Really, It means that I can play some real old games when the fancy takes me:D

    I agree with GBL - put it back together and resolve any issues you come across. Is a good learning experience
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+
    WIP: MCDST???
  5. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

    1,345
    12
    89
    finding out the spec is your next mission...if you choose to except it :p



    this message will now self distruct....

    grim
     
    Certifications: Bsc, 70-270, 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294, 70-298, 70-299, 70-620, 70-649, 70-680
    WIP: 70-646, 70-640
  6. Jagunco

    Jagunco Bit Poster

    40
    0
    26
    Good stuff I'll get on that today
     
    Certifications: You're having a laugh
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  7. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    after you get it working, then wipe the hard drive obviousley after making backups then reinstall everything, doing things yourself is the best way to learn.

    Yes you will make mistakes but you learn from them.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  8. ManicD

    ManicD Byte Poster

    237
    4
    34
    If all the components are scrap and you dont intend on using them again, i recommend opening up the hard drive and the cd drive, getting a look at how they actually function thus giving you an idea of what could go wrong in the future

    don't open the power supply, it can be very dangerous, same with CRT monitors
     
    Certifications: MCSA, N+, A+(Tech), ECDL
    WIP: 70-294, 70-298
  9. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

    13,493
    179
    287
    I agree. Taking it apart is no trick. The trick is putting it back together correctly so it works again. I'm not proud. If I have to label pieces or draw a little diagram of what goes where and how, I'll do it. It's better to have some method of putting the thing back together correctly than to try to "wing it" only to realize you've forgotten where those "extra" bits go.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  10. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

    1,345
    12
    89
    step one is to search for p0rn, step 2 is to back it up and then step 3 is reinstall covering your tracks :dry

    grim
     
    Certifications: Bsc, 70-270, 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294, 70-298, 70-299, 70-620, 70-649, 70-680
    WIP: 70-646, 70-640
  11. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    I agree with the other guys - you need to put it back together again.

    How old is 'old bugger'? Can you find out the spec, and try to figure out upgrading it? Finding compatible hardware for older systems can be quite an onerously daunting task if you're new to PCs.

    If you never intend on reassembling it, I have two sticks of old RAM I use for bookmarks, and I've seen PC cables being turned into jewellery for sale on eBay. Past that, I have no further advice!
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  12. Jagunco

    Jagunco Bit Poster

    40
    0
    26
    It looks like I must re assemble it now out of pride. Unfortunatly I think I already Donald Ducked it cos I took the CMOS battery out just to have a little peak and never put it back in (I think I did it cos it was the little thing I knew what it was).

    Old bugger would put it over 7 years old and basic. I'm looking up the specs now but even my untrained eye can pick out the lack of hardware in here.

    This little beast seems to be without both a graphics card or a sound card, which confused the hell out of me for a bit there. Its very emmbarissing but I think I mistook the internal modem for the sound card... I managed to put myself right though
     
    Certifications: You're having a laugh
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  13. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

    1,345
    12
    89
    i have an old P3 933mhz as a keyring, although because i snapped off all the 370 pins it left it a bit sharp and it gouged a chunk out my N95 :cry:

    grim
     
    Certifications: Bsc, 70-270, 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294, 70-298, 70-299, 70-620, 70-649, 70-680
    WIP: 70-646, 70-640
  14. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

    1,345
    12
    89
    if you've lost the battery just buy another one, you can pick them up from maplins for a few quid.

    a 7 year old pc would be a late pentium 2 early pentium 3 or an AMD t-bird around 400-500mhz

    grim
     
    Certifications: Bsc, 70-270, 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294, 70-298, 70-299, 70-620, 70-649, 70-680
    WIP: 70-646, 70-640
  15. Jagunco

    Jagunco Bit Poster

    40
    0
    26
    Certifications: You're having a laugh
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  16. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    Looking at the specs - I see that it has both graphics and sound on the motherboard....

    Which is why you didn't see separate cards!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  17. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

    19,136
    462
    374
    Now that you've put it back together, and you've got the mobo specs...

    ...try to upgrade it to it's maximum specifications, cheaply. Or, at the very least, research where you would buy the components from, and how much it would cost, if you were to do so.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  18. Jagunco

    Jagunco Bit Poster

    40
    0
    26
    Just been on my first CompTIA course and the first 'Lab' ws to strip and rebuild a computer. Good stuff. Other activites included putting in an extra hard drive and something else. All good stuff

    Feel a bit better tackling home projects now so :P to all you 'don't use the training providers' people :)
     
    Certifications: You're having a laugh
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  19. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    Well, bear in mind that a lot of people that feel IT is the career for them are natural "geeks", and have already got extensive experience taking computers apart and putting them back together again. They want to tackle the A+ as a foundation to their certification path.

    I have been ripping the guts out of computers since i got my first PC, which was a 386SX with Windows 3.11 for workgroups on it. Since then, i have stripped and re-built more computers than i could possibly remember and I still havent studied the A+ nor do i intend to but if i did it would definetly be by self study. I see no benefit in paying somebody to read to me from a book Jakanory style.

    So, it's horses for courses really.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  20. Rob1234

    Rob1234 Megabyte Poster

    784
    24
    69
    You will find people on here saying you should self study and do not use training providers you will also find people on here who write books aimed at the self study market. See the connection :dry Also some people see other people saying it and just joining in repeating what they say.
     
    Certifications: A few.

Share This Page

Loading...