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Subnetting??? Help me!

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by nic81, Sep 8, 2008.

  1. nic81

    nic81 Bit Poster

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    I have just started IP addresses, which i understand. I have moved onto subnetting and i dont understand so much........

    How much of this do i really need to know and understand right now for 70-271?

    I seem to be grasping most of everything else. Is there an easy way to understand subnetting?

    I would really appreciate the help....
     
    Certifications: None for IT, workng on it
    WIP: MCDST
  2. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Spend a couple of hours on the following site and see if that helps..

    http://www.learntosubnet.com
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  3. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    you do not need to learn how to subnet in the 271 exam. You will need to know the different types of subnet masks are there, and the how to work out which ip class it refers to and vise-a-versa
     
  4. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    You should probably learn how to subnet anyway as it's a useful skill. :) It'll certainly be needed for more difficult exams such as the CCNA (if you choose to obtain this when you have the relevant experience).

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  5. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Yep... and you'll never, ever, ever, ever be able to get away from subnetting. Might as well learn it.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  6. geevee

    geevee Bit Poster

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    Another thumbs up from me for http://www.learntosubnet.com , really helped me understand the whole thing while doing my network+. And you can't knock a great free resource like that!
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-290, 70-621
  7. nic81

    nic81 Bit Poster

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    Thanks so much!!!!!

    That website is amazing! The penny has dropped!! :D
    I cant believe how quickly i picked things up, now my study book makes sense. OK i dont know how much i'll remember by tomorrow but its a start, and a good one at that!

    Thanks again!!!!
     
    Certifications: None for IT, workng on it
    WIP: MCDST
  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Yes it is a great help, glad you liked it :)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    The way I remember which class an ip address is in (remember this all relates to the first octet)

    Firstly we convert binary to decimal (and visa versa) to calculate an octets value

    128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1 (bit value)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (bit number)

    each octet (or section of an ip address), is basically 8 bits long, so can be anything from 00000000 or 11111111 or anything in between, for class a imagine

    Bit 1 is always 0

    ie
    00000001 is 1
    or
    01000000 is 64
    or
    01111111 is 127 (word of warning, 127 is reserved for loopback so is not used in a network), so this we use to work out

    SO Class A always use between 0 and 126 for the first octet

    for Class b, the second digit is 0, and the first is always 1

    10000000 is 128
    or
    10100000 is 160
    or
    10111111 is 191

    SO Class b always use between 128 and 191 for the first octet

    and for Class C we have the 3rd bit always 0

    11000000 is 192
    or
    11010000 is 208
    or
    11011111 is 223

    224 onwards is used for multicast addresses but this is probably something you dont need to know at the moment.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal

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