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Studying.....*help*

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by swatto, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. swatto

    swatto Byte Poster

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    Hey all :D

    Im desperately trying to get some sort of I.T Qualification, MCP, A+ anything but everytime I think of studying it all seems too much work and too much effort I just have no motivation and Im scared of spending loads of time on it and failing at the end - I finish work in the evening and im so tired and drained the prospect of studying/reading is none existent :(

    Please help....
     
    Certifications: BTEC Nat Dip: Software Dev, A+
    WIP: None Yet
  2. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Slowly slowly catchy monkey. Set a plan - A+ then N+ then MCDST perhaps?

    The best way to study (from my personal experience) is just to read the material for enjoyment. I'm currently reading the MS Press book for 70-272 and I find that just by reading it I absorb information.

    ...Then at the end of every chapter write a few notes.

    Think of it as a enjoyable learning experience. Try to designate some time (perhaps during lunch/work) to read a bit at a time.

    It's not a race you know :) You'll be surprised at how much you remember.

    Obviously when closer to the exam then you'll be able to revise properly and have the motivation to see it through.

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Ok, first of all, you need to change your outlook, with a negative outlook you've already failed. You need to have a positive outlook and set goals that you want to achieve.

    Second of all, studying, there's no way around it, you will have to put in some sort of studying in order to pass the exams... So you're tired in the evenings, but you have to get to work and back home... Think about study materials, audio tracks (a few companies produce them) - so you can "learn on the go". Fun mini games to help re-enforce your knowledge, Proprofs (for example) do some online games to help you. If you are going to do the A+ then I would recommend buying a A+ book, the Mike Meyers AiO is a very big heavy big - granted, but there are other books out there like PC Technician Street Smarts. You don't have to spend hours at a time reading, 1/2 hour here, 1/2 hour there. Another form of resource that is very useful are CBT's, a little more expensive, but more interactive than books.

    There's quite a few of us here that work full-time, have families & study part-time (some of us have done degree's, the MCSE/MCSA, etc in those times). It can be done, it's not going to be easy, but then if it was easy would it be worth it?

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  4. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    I find the thought of studying is rarely as bad as the actuality of studying. I force myself to start then I'm normally fine.

    One related study technique I've heard of is to force yourself to study for at least 15 minutes per day. If you're doing well, carry on. If you can't concentrate then stop. There are plenty of study tips articles on t'interweb which are worth a look.
    As Qs said, maybe starting with A+ would be the best bet. Have a look at professormesser.com, there are lots of short (10-20 min) videos, for free, covering all the A+ objectives there.That'll give you a good idea of what's involved and you may find it more to your taste.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  5. swatto

    swatto Byte Poster

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    Thankyou for your help all - much appreciated :)

    I will take a look at that PC Technician Street Smarts book as it has some nice reviews. Will also look into other study methods but I think I learn best by reading and doing. I looked into the A+ and I shyed away from it due to it having alot of hardware related questions (which im not too confident with and so will struggle to remember) whereas I think the MCP 70-270 or 70-271 will be more beneficial to my current job (1st line support administrator).
     
    Certifications: BTEC Nat Dip: Software Dev, A+
    WIP: None Yet
  6. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Having a bit of knowledge in all areas can only be beneficial in the long run. A+, N+ and MCDST is the usually way to go about things.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  7. Evilwheato

    Evilwheato Kilobyte Poster

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    The A+ is a great entry level cert, because it's pretty enjoyable to do. See if you can get yourself an old computer and fiddle about with it- it will give you some great first hand experience.

    The Mike Meyers book is an easy read. Just do what Qs said- read each chapter and make notes.
    Also look atProfessor Messor's Free A+ videos.
     
  8. swatto

    swatto Byte Poster

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    The thing is having looked into the A+ there are questions like:

    which type of connector is this
    how many pins are in this type of connector

    ^^

    I mean will I have to remember this kind of stuff for the exam? (really putting me off)

    Plus I know how to build a computer from scratch and troubleshoot hardware, I also know how to install operating systems/troubleshoot software problems/errors - as things like this I do for my job so im not sure if the A+ is right for me??
     
    Certifications: BTEC Nat Dip: Software Dev, A+
    WIP: None Yet
  9. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Specific nit-picky questions will always appear in every exam. Just remember - Not all of the questions will be like this! The A+ is designed to be a vendor neutral foundation exam with a focus on physical hardware.

    Its aim is to provide you with the skills to understand low level stuff.

    I'm sure there will be information in the A+ that you never previously knew, and it will help you with any future certifications you wish to take at the very least!

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  10. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    look at it this way if someone asks you if an old AGP graphics card will fit in their new mobo then you will be able to say no to them because the no mobo will be PCIe and not AGP etc
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  11. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Not necessarily. Although no new motherboards (with new chipsets) are equipped with AGP support there are still motherboards being produced (using older chipsets) which do.

    But, I do get your point. Doing the A+ would give you a better hardware understanding for future jobs/certs which will be useful :)

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  12. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I was meaning new mobos as AGP is almost defunct.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  13. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Yeah, that's what I'm saying. It's a dying technology but your statement wasn't 100% bang on.

    Suffice it to say there are new motherboards being produced (using slightly older chipsets) that are still classed as "new" which still have the ability to support AGP.

    (I'm obviously just bitter as my home-rig still uses a 9700 pro :wink:)

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA

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