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Starting my A+ Studies!

Discussion in 'A+' started by Eternal_Inertia, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. Eternal_Inertia

    Eternal_Inertia New Member

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    Hey guys,

    Well I received my Meyer's A+ book this morning and my god it's huge!

    Just was wondering, for those who have self studied using this book, how you went around getting through it? Just literally pick it up and read every chapter front to back? Did you make notes on each chapter?

    I'm a big fan of highlighting important parts of books and annotating in the book, but would be a shame to deface it.
     
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I read it from front to back - twice, and made notes on the way.

    I have a deep aversion to writing in books, except to put my name on the flyleaf. :biggrin

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    Create time to go through book at your pace but obviously taking notes as well as getting hands on bit done as well.
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell
  4. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

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    I read through the book cover to cover, then done it again taking notes and really learning all those little things you need to know. Then I put together a few excel spreadsheets which helped alot with important info that I needed to memorise.

    :)
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  5. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I read the book once then went through it again highlighting important parts instead of taking notes.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I generally read a book from cover to cover... then re-read anything that didn't "stick" the first time.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. Ozzie

    Ozzie Nibble Poster

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    I read it from cover to cover, then read it again taking notes. These books don't seem so large once you get used to them.
     
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  8. asje1

    asje1 Byte Poster

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    I read books cover to cover highlighting bits I didnt already know or that seem important, then once the book has been read skim read again but read the highlighted areas with more concentration.

    JE
     
    Certifications: A+, N+
  9. Spilly

    Spilly Kilobyte Poster

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    Yeah me too!

    I also used Wikapedia a lot to gain knowledge!

    Additional exam prep simulators like Transender can provide a more interactive learning experience.
    But there is no short cut to reading the book from cover to cover at least twice!
     
    Certifications: A+,N+,S+,MCP,MCDST,MCITP,MCTS,MCSA,CISMP,PCI-P,SSCP
    WIP: CCSK
  10. GW

    GW Byte Poster

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    It's scary how big the A+ books are nowadays, when I went for my A+ certification back in 1997 there was only one book available and it was around 100 pages. The two exams were 50 questions each with 90 minutes to complete each one.

    If you didn't have a lot of work experience you wouldn't pass from just reading the book, I remember the one section of the exam I almost failed was the printer repair section since that was something I never did at any of the places I worked at.

    Good luck man and study hard!

    GW
     
    Certifications: MCP x4, CompTia x3
    WIP: Cisco CCNA
  11. djbonnett

    djbonnett Banned

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    Hi there

    You am not alone!!!!
    I have been advised not to read from just one book.
    So have got a few books on 601 and 602 exams now and I find it better when studying.

    I have though found a brilliant site:
    http://www.mcmcse.com/comptia/aplus/notes/aplus_essentials.shtml

    It appears to cover everything and its free!
    Take alook and good luck!!!!
    Chow for now
     
    Certifications: C.L.A.I.T.
    WIP: A+ and MCDBA
  12. purplejade

    purplejade Nibble Poster

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    Hi, there

    The A+ book is pretty thick so is N+, but Mark Meyers has done an exellent job, as other guys have pointed out its a good idea to read it through and put them on excel sheets stuff like IRQs various Pentium architectures etc, and you can go back and zip through it, it helps you remember, but best of luck I have gone through the book twice, and am currrently reading N+ by the same author , hope to give both exams
    very soon.....
     
    Certifications: CCNA N+
    WIP: A+
  13. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I know we talk about the A+ certification as being "entry-level" and that gives the impression that the information is easily and quickly learned (as compared to more advanced subjects), but that is not particularly true. Sure, if you've been taking apart and putting together PCs and laptops for 10 years, maybe by repetition, you've gotten good at it and learned a lot, but if you are fairly new to the subject, it's pretty involved.

    There are actually a lot of "pieces" to hardware and OS troubleshooting, repair, and maintenance. It's not just knowing how to install a stick of RAM or add a new sound card. That's why the books are so thick. Don't get discouraged.

    As the others said, first read the whole book cover-to-cover, as if you were reading a novel. Don't worry about trying to memorize anything the first time through. Just assess your comprehension as you are reading (Did I understand what Mike was describing or was it totally foreign to me?). The next time through, start studying. Some of the material may be pretty easy for you so it won't take much effort. Other parts will require that you spend some time studying the content and accessing other sources (this is where other books and online content comes in).

    This is also where your lab machine(s) come in. There are portions of the book where Mike tells you to grab your screwdriver, open up the box and have a look inside. You'll remember more about what you did than what you read during the actual exam and you are employing a number of different learning methods (reading, kinetic, tactile) so it's more likely that the part you are trying to learn will "stick".

    When you've exhausted all options and you're still stuck with something, post it here and we'll give you a hand. That's pretty much how it works.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  14. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Yep - "entry-level" doesn't always mean "easy-level". Those who think that they don't need to get the A+ because they're "beyond all that" are sometimes those who REALLY need to do the A+ due to a lack of fundamental, basic computer knowledge.

    Build a strong foundation, and everything you build on top of it will be kept upright.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  15. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    As said Entry level does not mean easy level.

    When I got the Mike Myeres AIO 6th edit I was supprised by the information contained, it is like taking the introduction to computer systems module and operating systems module with a bit of networking I did in my HND Business computing course at LMU.

    It has made me remember topics I did and I have also learned new things (seen as though when I was at Uni we used Windows 95 and Unix) So I have learned about XP and the New file Structures and bits and bobs about other things I didn't do at Uni.

    This book is a must for anyone doing the A+

    Also Trips book (PC Technician Street Smarts by Jame Pyles) has helped me hone some skill I had got lazy with and has even taught me better ways of doing things.

    So his book is also a must buy.

    Thanks Trip :)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  16. THXbob

    THXbob Bit Poster

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    Its is a big book and I was surprised by its size too.

    I'm half way through it now and l'm just reading it like a novel. As I work in IT there's a lot of stuff that I can skip but when I go through it a second time I'll make notes on bus speeds and the technical figures etc. but I won't write in my MM A+ book!

    As its job related I can read it at work too as I don't always have the time or too tired to study at home having a full-time job (and some weekends) plus a family.

    Get stuck in, its an enjoyable read!

    Bob
     
    WIP: CompTIA A+ and Network+

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