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Sorry, i think this...

Discussion in 'General Microsoft Certifications' started by Boycie, May 31, 2005.

  1. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I think this has already be brought up If I could only remember where :oops:

    Anyhow, I hope to get Network+ certified soon and then wish to go down the MCSE road. :D

    My question is for someone in my position (never worked as an IT professional) should I take the 2000 or 2003 route?
    I seem to remember someone (rightly or wrongly) saying 2003 is really an upgrade rather than an outright course.
    I have also noticed some providers still advertise the MCSE with 2000.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  2. Makaveli

    Makaveli Byte Poster

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    Im by no means an expert, but whilst browsing through the forums I think the experts would recommend taking the 2000 course as alot on employers still use 2000 and once you have achieved 2000 it only takes 2 additional exams to become 2003 certified!

    Experts feel free to correct me if im wrong......
     
  3. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Thanks,

    As you say, a lot of companies are still using 2K
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  4. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    As far as I'm aware, the only difference between the 2 MCSE's is the different bit of the operating systems that W2K dosn't have/use. i think that the design exams have just been updated but are much the same.

    Again I stand to be corrected by those who know better.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCSA (messaging), ITIL Foundation v3
    WIP: Looking at doing ..................
  5. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    I guess you would have to look at how mant businesses still use 2000. Anyone running 2000 wouldn't necessarily jumped at upgrading to 2003, so they must still be out there.
    You can certify as MCSE 2000 with the 7 exams, then upgrade with a further 2, which get you MCSE 2000 and 2003. Find out if your training provider offers that option, as it could be a good deal.
    Microsoft have recently announced the end of the 2000 series, I think client goes in the next month or so and server by the end of the year, so you won't be able to buy it anymore. However, they don't seem to have announced the end of product support date or any exam retirements yet.
    I guess they want people to start moving to 2003, as it will make the upgrade to Longhorn more seamless than trying to do it from 2000.
    But someone out there has got to be doing the upgrading...
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  6. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    ok
    Take the 2003 track
    end of discussion






    lol, no really,
    The 2003 track is NOT just an upgrade, i think what most people were saying is dont bother with the 2000 track as you would just have to upgrade anyway

    2003 contains much if not everything 2000 had/has, with frilly bits on top
    couple that with the fact you will learn methods of migrating and interoperating with 2000 and NT4 on the 2003 track and you realise that this is infact, the only choice for sane people

    Let us assume that by the time you pass 2003 MCSE, Microsoft will of lowered support for windows 2000, longhorn will be on the way in, and blackcomb server will be back on track
    ask not how useful a 2000 mcse will be now, ask how useful it will be in a year or two!

    not ofcourse that it wont be useful, MCSEs have remained similar even since the NT4 days, although the way of doing thngs was slightly different

    Dont assume that because 'most' businesses use 2000 that they will hire a 2000 mcse over a 2003 mcse
    those 'most' businesses are on the look out to migrate, and they need talent and experiance to do that
    whilst looking for work recently i've had a number of possiblities that have mentioned the near future upgrade of major servers (even if keeping their AD a 2000 AD) this includes some major investment banks who are generally, VERY slow to move (for instance GPMC are still running NT4 domains as well as 2k domains and Novell trees, it gets pretty complicated) :)

    hope that helps

    remember, go 2k3
    end of story!
    :)

    And Jonny
    upgrading doesnt give you a second MCSE
    there is no such concept
    an MCSE is a title, Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
    (yes i know it says it twice in my profile, but that doesnt mean anything 'officially' as far as MS are concerned)

    all the upgrade does is upgrade your skills to include the current technology, why bother? why not still do 7 exams and have those skills anyway? as well as all the 2k skills?

    you can not become an MCSE x2, as I posted in another recent thread
    and i should know :P
    infact I didnt even get a new certificate/badge till i asked for one when they changed the design, LOL

    Seriously guys, have a think about it
    If you learn how an engine works on the 2000 model or the 1995 model, is it likely to make a major difference? i think not! but why learn on the 1995 model just because people still drive it? people drive the 2000 model to right, and the only difference is the fancy new electronic components and shinier spark plugs right?
    right.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  7. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    Nuts. I love the badges!

    Sorry, I didn't mean that you got two MCSE's, just that you would be certified in both technolgies so you could keep any prospective employer happy.
    I'm not an MCSE, so I'm not an expert.
    God forbid, all those wires!
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  8. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    right, but most employers would be happy with an MCSE who is knowledgeable in 2k and 2k3, they dont care what ur mcse is in, as theres no way to tell either way :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0

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