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So I've been looking at Network Engineering jobs

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by Juelz, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    And have a few questions..

    Do you need a degree? because most of the ones I've seen, for entry jobs they want a degree!, has anyone worked as a Network Engineer without a degree? Also what degree are they actually looking for?

    secondly why do so many of these jobs want the candidate to have skills in programming languages like C++?
     
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  2. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Network engineers don't generally program in C++, are you sure they are really not development positions with some networking thrown in ?
     
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  3. Josiahb

    Josiahb Gigabyte Poster

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    You'll find a fair amount of weird looking dual role positions at the lower end, some IT departments use the fact that new graduates and new entrants into the IT field may not have settled on whether they want to work in support or development.

    A lot of these type of roles will specify that you need to be a graduate in a relevant field as well, it just makes CV culling a lot easier. Of course in can mean you miss out on the perfect self taught candidate.
     
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  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Actually I don't see that many C++ roles these days which is why after 7 years as a fulltime C++ programmer I got out of that niche.
     
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  5. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Well that sucks... I have a choice to finish my business degree.. I've got it at a foundation degree and could do one more year to top it up, do you think it would make a difference having a business degree to get a job as a network engineer? Im actually doing all my certs at college.. as self-taught just doesnt work for me for practical subjects.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
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  6. Josiahb

    Josiahb Gigabyte Poster

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    A business degree (in fact any degree) isn't massively helpful in the early going in support but can help a lot if and when it comes to moving up to management. I'd say it would be a shame to waste the time and effort you've put in so far and not finish things off.

    Any degree shows a solid commitment to your own personal development, combine that with your work in getting certifications the right way with proper study and hard work and you start to look like a very promising candidate for any role.
     
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  7. BraderzTheDog

    BraderzTheDog Kilobyte Poster

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    As a Network Engineer I would say a degree isn't important, I don't have one and probably never will.

    If its an entry level network engineering role I imagine the reason they want a degree is to benchmark a candidates ability to learn. Remember at entry level you are not required to understand the role inside out, but to have a hunger to learn and determination to succeed.

    That being said, C++ wont help you at all and is pointless for a network engineer. You need to start looking at networking basics; how packets work / tcp / subnetting. Maybe start to get to grips with kit you will be working with such as Cisco.

    Don't be put off by the degree thing. I got my first networking job at 16, and im almost 20 now, never been to college let alone university. Keep perusing, you will get there with the right attitude.
     
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  8. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Im studying all my IT certs at college so if I do go the cisco route it will be taught in a class. I am tempted to do the MCSA win 7 via self study though. ..
     
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  9. Black Tortoise

    Black Tortoise Byte Poster

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    If you ask me the CCNA is just as hard as a degree level course.
     
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  10. BraderzTheDog

    BraderzTheDog Kilobyte Poster

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    Couldn't agree more, the CCNA is more valuable than a degree. At the end of the day which qualification is worth the most? A degree that covers many concepts and is not specific in any way to a particular vendor, or a qualification from a vendor that have their kit in almost every data centre?

    I'm not saying a degree is pointless, but there are alot of graduates out there that can't get jobs mainly because the degree isn't directly relevant to the job and possibly lack of experience. In the end, I would say try and get exposure to as much network kit as possible (firewalls / routers / switches / load balancer ) it will help you no end having exposure to this kit.
     
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  11. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Some truly bizarre comments in this thread apart from C++ not being needed for a network role which I agree with. :)

    The CCNA is just as hard a degree? There is no comparison between the two – the value of a degree can depend on what job role is and what University it was obtained from.

    The CCNA is a great cert but remember someone can just purchase the answers from the tinterweb and pass the exam which is shame as it puts down the value of certification when it’s on a CV.

    A degree isn’t needed for a network engineer role? Can be argued either way but I would hope that people would want to move away from being a network engineer eventually and move into a consultancy\design role and perhaps even a senior management or director role. A degree *may* help with this type of job.

    People will find their own path in regard to certs (either self-study or classroom training) or go down the degree route when trying to improve their career prospects. I do all the interviewing for the helpdesk and senior infrastructure guys in my current role and have never make a degree or certs a requirement in a job spec.

    I do however question why someone hasn’t done any certifications if they have 5+ years experience but in saying that the last guy I interviewed had 20 years experience and had just decided to get certs so he could try and move up the ladder.

    Getting back to the OP – it will be unlikely you will land a networking role when you graduate. It will more than likely be a desktop\helpdesk support role and then you can start see how you can progress from there.
     
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  12. Black Tortoise

    Black Tortoise Byte Poster

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    The amount to learn in a degree far exceeds CISCO's CCNA, however the level of knowledge and understanding , IMHO is just as hard as a degree.

    Let me illustrate the point I am trying to make with my expample : - I'm currently doing a distance study BTEC Electronic Engineering course with ICS, I plan to use this to get onto a HNC then HND course. I expect the level of knowledge to be higher in the HNC and HND than to what I am learning now - this was the point I was trying to make.

    Getting a job in network in my experience is a mixed bag, but generally most will agree that only those who have exposure to the respective technology will have an advantage in applications, and with certs, furthermore advantage.

    As for getting answers for exams, and it devaaluing certs, I dont know people bang on about this. People who do this will be exposed during the technical assesment, I'd dread to think what kind of an outfit I'd be working for if I got a network engineer job who doesn't perform tech. assesment.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
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