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Skipping helpdesk.

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by coolc, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    Is it possible to skip helpdesk or any other desktop support role in I.T. Also is it a good or a bad idea?
     
  2. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    It really depends on what you want to do, if for instance you want to be a programmer then yes, however if you want to become a 2nd line \ junior network engineer then no, it's not a good idea. You need to learn your trade somewhere and 1st line \ service desk is were you learn it.

    It would be like a person wanting to become a brain surgeon becoming one without having done an internship at a hospital, highly unlikely.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
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  3. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    but what if you know your stuff, do you still have to do your dues in helpdesk/desktop support?
     
  4. j1mgg

    j1mgg Kilobyte Poster

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    You might knwo your IT stuff but that isnt all that IT support is about. I think you would have to prove you have good customer service skills and actually know how to use your IT knowledge in a corporate enviroment.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, ITIL V3 Foundation, MCDST, 70-270, 70-290
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  5. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    How can you "know your stuff" if you haven't done it on the job?
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  6. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    And besides, you need to be able to prove you know your stuff. Employers arent really going to just take your word for it, are they?

    On an unrelated note, I'm a whizz financial investor. Fancy sending me some of your money, and I will invest it for you to get you a good return? I haven't actually ever done it in a professional capacity. I do know my onions though...

    Edit: Dont let that stop you from applying to other jobs though. You may get lucky. There's nothing inherently wrong with applying if you think you have the skills to do the job.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
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  7. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    yeah what i mean is i just want to know, for an example what if you get like a junior sys admin role at a small company and its a trainnee role, which provides on the job trainning, is it a good idea to take it or just reject it and go for low level roles, i believe take whats best for you and a role that you will learn, and have good progression, instead of a easy role.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
  8. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    The job will ask for experience, experience you do not have OP. Simple as that. People are not advertising 2nd line and above with "no prior experience necessary".

    Stop being lazy and start at the bottom like everyone else.

    Don't get caught up in job titles. Systems Admin, Analyst, Engineer, Network Admin, Blah Blah Blah. It's all words. If it is a trainee role, then you can almost guarantee you will be dogs body. I'd personally put it this way, I would rather be on the help-desk learning stuff than be in a "trainee" (quotations for a good reason because don't believe everything they tell you) position that has you assigning tickets and nothing else.

    Make a careful decision, if you don't work in IT currently, then take any role, if you do work in IT already, then take a move up but you can't skip anything because the bottom here, is mostly the same as the bottom there.

    If you get any job, whether it's sys admin or not, why would you turn it down? that's like me saying "If I get offered the CEO job at Microsoft tomorrow, should I turn it down and start at the bottom like everyone else?"
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  9. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    Im not being lazy and you dont even know me so dont say things that you do not know, as for experience i do have i.t experience, who said i dont,? Just because i made a topic like this doesnt mean i do not have experience or quals. I am in service desk i have being for the last 3 years along with some certs. I just wanted peoples opinion.
     
  10. Sprog

    Sprog New Member

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    I think that's an interesting question actually which would be really helpful if the veterans could expand on this.

    I'm starting out and possibly like most beginners I've taken it as gospel that you have to get a job in 1st line support without question. I can easily see why it's an excellent way but are there actually other ways?

    This has led me to ask something else but I've realised it's best served in its own thread!
     
  11. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    You don't NEED to start out at the bottom, but realistically that is what you should be aiming for, by all means though, the higher up you can start the better. It's just that help-desk happens to be the starting post, if you can skip it, good stuff, but don't have the attitude of "I'm not doing it, I want to start higher" I think is what we try to get across.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  12. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    I think with any skill set you have to go progress through levels of expertise and experience, I know what you mean when you feel you wont be challenged, or you think your time would be better spent learning "higher level skills" but IT really is a career where you need a good foundation of technical and softskills, soft skills such as Time management, dealing with people, learning about how a help/servicedesk operates are all lines to progress up the ladder, but with like every ladder you need a solid couple of good rungs at the bottom otherwise it collapses.

    I personally would look to be an onsite technician but with the job market, working in IT in a helpdesk capacity isnt a shameful option, it is a good springboard to start from.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
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  13. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    Personally I think there are so many non-technical skills you need to have to be an effective tech that unless you have experience with these, you should only look at starting at the bottom. There's also a huge gap between knowing your techie stuff on paper and knowing your techie stuff in the trenches.

    Is it possible? Yes, but it's unlikely anyone would take the chance when there are plenty of experienced techs sitting idle.
    Is it a bad idea? In my opinion, yes.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
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  14. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    I think the biggest fear people have when applying for a "helpdesk" role is the scenario where they are shoved in front of a PC with a script and given very limited freedom to develop in their abilities.

    Really. This is not necessarily true. It just depends where you're applying for your roles. Basically, the smaller the firm, the smaller their overall IT budget, the less likely they are to pigeon-hole you in to a restrictive non-developmental role.

    I work on a helpdesk. I've been a "First Line Support Analyst" for nearly 4 years. Yes, the job title gets on my wobbly bits, but at the end of the day, it is only a job title.

    For the OP, I got in to this role with *no* prior support experience, but a bucketload of customer service experience, so getting a full range of service disciplines under your belt will always serve you in great stead as you work your way up the ladder. I started off answering the support desk phone, imaging PCs, dealing with user queries, all the normal day-to-day stuff. I'm now a domain administrator working on AD, Exchange, BES, Citrix, server builds, project rollouts... but I'm still a "First Line Support Analyst". The title is now meaningless, and to get here I just applied for and got a job with an SMB that is progressive, with an IT manager that is not afraid to develop keen and able staff.

    Work on the basis that it's always cheaper to promote from within - if you can do the job, and the progression space is there, then they'll encourage you to get there, IMO.

    Of course, scenarios will vary from business to business and industry to industry... just use your common sense and your interview time to gauge what you feel about their business. Apply for roles that you think you can get with the experience tucked under your belt. Remember, job interviews aren't just a one way street - ask them about the business' prospects, recent financial results, long term aims etc (if they don't freely advertise this on the web). If the IT manager seems a bit reactionary in policies and staff training, then decline the role if offered.

    I do know two peeps who have gone straight in to slightly more senior IT positions at the start of their career - but we're talking Zebulebu and Pheo, and they're both frightening geniuses one step away from being part of the Collective. For us standard human beings, it's about using your common sense to get the best possible return from your employment.

    Yep. That was a ramble and a half. Good luck understanding it :rolleyes: :p
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
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  15. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    I am a person who have being in service desk/helpdesk for about 3 years and I am looking to move on into something that is more technical, also I have learned the basics quiet well and have certifications.
     
  16. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    Well that's more than enough to start applying for more progressive roles :) what certs do you have?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  17. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    MS

    Microsoft
     
  18. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Then you won't be skipping the service desk work then will you? so the original post was actually pointless as far as you are concerned?

    Define further your Microsoft certs.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  19. coolc

    coolc Nibble Poster

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    Wrong thread moved!
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
  20. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    Wrong thread mate.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3

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