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Should network core be routed or switched

Discussion in 'Routing & Switching' started by mentman, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. mentman

    mentman Bit Poster

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    Hi everyone,

    According to the cisco modular network design, the access layer should be switched to the distribution layer, and after that the distribution layer should be L3 links to the core. Thats correct right?

    Should the redundant links between a dual core core, be routed L3 or switched L2, and why?

    Ta
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCENT, ITE, 642-812 BCMSN
    WIP: 642-901 BCSI
  2. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    What do you mean by layer 3 links? If your network is big enough to warrant full use of Cisco's access/distribution/core model then i'd suggest you will be using L3 switching at least from the distribution layer.
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  3. mentman

    mentman Bit Poster

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    Thanks, thats what I thought, but then trainsignal's bcmsn "network design and models" video stated;

    "We want our core layers to handle switching and our distribution layers to handle routing."

    "The distribution layer is also where routing should take place when utilizing multilayer switches, since the access layer is busy with end users and we want our core to be concerned only with switching, not routing."

    Im watching this thinking WFT!
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCENT, ITE, 642-812 BCMSN
    WIP: 642-901 BCSI
  4. mentman

    mentman Bit Poster

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    lol hold on,

    is L3 switching the same as L3 Routing?
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCENT, ITE, 642-812 BCMSN
    WIP: 642-901 BCSI
  5. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Someone more clued up on the three layer model will be able to explain better than i can what they are saying in that statement.

    L3 switching is switches which forward based using source/destination IP rather than standard switches which use L2 info (MAC source/destination)

    they can route much faster than routers because of the hardware inside the switch. Routers route using software.

    I'm sure someone here will give you a more clear explanation!
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    The core layer's purpose is to move packets across the backbone as quickly as possible. Switching is generally faster than routing - only two OSI layers to deal with - so you'll generally throw down a switched backbone. That's why you want to handle all your routing, access lists, security, etc. at the distribution and access layers.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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