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setting up server for web and domain

Discussion in 'Networks' started by twizzle, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    Ok i've decided to re look at my home server set up. I want a domain server, but i also want to try to set it up for a web server so that i can do soem website designs and have them go live to show people. Obviously i dont want the domain part to be accessible to those online (except via remote connection such as VPN).

    Now i already have a domain name registered for web stuff. Squiretwizz.co.uk. So to make my 1 server work as i want, do i just call it squiretwizz? And if i do that (as i understand it adding the .co.uk makes the whole thing open to web) how do i make just part of it teh squiretwizz.co.uk? is that done in IIS console? will that add the .co.uk to just the files in the we folder?
    Have i even got this correct anyway? and if using windows server 2003 enterprise will i still need Apache installed?
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, N+, MS 70-271, 70-272
    WIP: Being a BILB,
  2. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    A web server can have any name, it doesn't need to be the same name as the domain or something like "www". The rest are simply aliases. The web server can even belong to a completely different domain from the one you would see it on the internet.

    When someone types "www.domain.ext", the DNS server simply sends them an IP address in return. This IP address must be that of the web server so that it responds to web queries. The web server (IIS in this case) can also host multiple website, you simply configure it so that if a user on the internet sends a query to www.domain.ext, then the "www" website opens up. And if the user sends a query to sales.domain.ext, then the "sales" portion of the website opens up. The IP can still be the same.

    In any case, publishing your IIS server on the internet is going to require a few important steps to protect it from being compromised, so I suggest you spend a little time reading up on IIS, and then ensure that you have an adequate firewall in place, that your router allows HTTP (or HTTPS) access 'only' (to start off with) to the IP of the IIS server (some NAT forwarding may need to be put in place on your router... unless of course your server is directly connected to the internet and has received a public IP), and so on.

    I could write more, but I'm in a bit of a rush =\
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
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  3. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    No, because Apache is a web server, and you will be using IIS, which is a web server :biggrin

    So, in essence they both do the same job, though many would argue that Apache does it better 8)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  4. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    You can run Apache on Windows if you really want to but I guess it really depends on what you have developed your websites with.

    In regard to hosting websites I take it this is just for testing? A home ADSL connection will really start to struggle if the site generates any kinda traffic because of the limitations of ADSL.

    Also do you have a static IP address on your broadband connection? I know you can use dynamic DNS but a static IP is really needed here.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
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  5. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    Sparky, it is mainly for testing, plus i'm planning on doing 1 site for a friend but dont expect lots of trafiic to it, well not to start with, so the home BB should be ok. I dont have a static IP, apparently my ISP wont issue them, so i will be using Dyndns.

    Whats confused me about all this is that they say dont have your home domain ending in c.om or .co.uk as this will publish it on the net. But if you need to setup nameservers to point to that address anyways i dont see how that makes any difference. Surley just by adding .com dosent make it automatically a web domain?

    Im in no rush on this as dont plan to start any messing around until next week when im off for the week due to xmas hols. Have 7 days with no work and no kids so plenty of time to play.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, N+, MS 70-271, 70-272
    WIP: Being a BILB,
  6. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Windows networks now rely heavily on DNS for local name resolution. Active Directory, depends on DNS.

    Now say you make your local namespace Twizzle.com, the root hints DNS servers on the Internet are *Authoritative* (know about) the .com domain as it is a root domain. So, your internal DNS server will query other DNS servers that will pass the request onto a server that is authoritative for the .com domain (a root hints server) that will know nothing of your local domain. To put it simply, you do not want to confuse your poor internal DNS server and his Internet friends, the forwarders. So, call your own local domain something unique, like .cotton or .local as no internet servers know about those domains, only your local one will.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)

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