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Setting up a seperate network at home

Discussion in 'Networks' started by michael78, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    I'm wanting to keep my home study network domain seperate from my main PC and wife's laptop so that they don't see each other. My routers internal IP is 192.168.0.1 but I want to put my home network on a 10.10.0.0 range. I have a switch I can setup VLAN's on which I intend to do to seperate the network traffic. I want some of my servers to have internet access so to enable that do I setup DNS to forward to 192.168.0.1? Take it that should work whilst keeping my main PC and wife's laptop seperate.
     
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  2. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    What router are you using?
     
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  3. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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  4. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    Slypie, when you say servers what do you mean, do I remember rightly that you bought a couple of t105's or ml110's for vmware, if so you could connect your servers to an isolated lan in vmware and bridge the isolated one with the "vm network" with vyatta software routers.

    Not sure if vlaning would work in your instance I dont know how one network would know how to get to another without routers connecting to the vlans
     
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  5. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Basically I have 3 ML115's and a T105 server which eventually will host ESX/ESXi and Hyper-V on them running an openfiler SAN to host the VM's on. This will be my testing rig. On the other side I have my main gaming/email/browsing PC, wife's laptop, living room media PC, linux PC and 2 of my own laptops that are stand alone machines and I want to keep it that way and seperate the network traffic from my testing rig. Laptops are wireless and go direct to my ISP's modem so thats not a massive issue as such. My main PC and the other PC's go into a bog standard 8 port switch. My test rig goes into the 3com managed switch and daisy chains into the bog standard switch which goes into my ISP modem.

    I thought I should be able to leave my stand alone PC's and laptops as they are on a 192.168.0.0 address and setup my test rig on a VLAN on a different say 10.10.0.0 IP range and subnet and have the DNS server forward requests to my ISP modem for DNS resolution. Got to be honest I've never setup or thought of this type of setup before so am a little stuck as to how best to seperate the 2 sides.
     
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  6. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    That is a switch. Do you mean your router hangs off of this?

    Do i have it correct in that you want to keep the 192.168.0.0 network in place as it is, with your main PC and wifes laptop connected on this subnet. Then you want to create a 10.10.0.0 network on this switch for your study domain?

    If so, you will need routing somewhere for routing between the 192.168.0.0 net and the 10.0.0.0 net. This switch won't do what you need.
     
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  7. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    Your aiming for something like this Sly

    [added]
    forgot to add a netmask lol 255.255.255.0
     

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2010
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  8. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    More like this. Home PC's on the right, servers on the left. Sorry for the poor effort lol. The writing isn't very clear but the servers plug into the manager switch and the managed switch then plugs into the unmanaged switch. This should keep the 2 sides seperate from each other if I create a VLAN on the managed switch with a different IP range and subnet surely?
     

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2010
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  9. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    You can create a VLAN on the managed switch, but its not going to mean anything to the other switch if it's an unmanaged switch as it will know nothing of the VLAN config. Also, if you have a standard ISP sort of router, it's not likely you can do the required config to allow the router to route between VLANs (which you will need if you want those servers to access the internet).
     
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  10. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Changed my name guys just in case your confused lol

    my router does allow VLAN's to be configured. I don't quite understand why this wouldn't work. If I used my managed switch and configured a VLAN on say the 10.10.0.0 range for my testing network surely this would keep that separate from my home PC on a 192.168.0.0 range as it doesn't connect to that switch and even if it did I could configure it on a different VLAN. The only time it would need to go through the unmanaged switch is if I needed to get to the internet which will be rare. Surely setting up a VLAN keeps the internal network traffic separate from each other. I thought the only issue I would have would be getting my test network to comunicate with my router as it would have a 192.168.0.1 address which I thought you would add an entry in DNS to get around that issue. Am I totally wrong about my proposed setup :oops:
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2010
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  11. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    The gateway device is the issue here.

    You have your servers patched into your 3COM switch then your ISPs router. Then you have your home PCs into an unmanaged switch and then into the router.

    Both subnets need a default gateway on *their* subnet, how are you going to achieve this with the router you have?
     
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  12. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yes, the will be separate, in that broadcasts from the 192.168.0.0 network will not be forwarded out any ports you configure on the managed switch as being a vlan other than the native.

    However, as has been said you CANNOT route between the two networks to allow internet access for the servers, as per your initial requirement.

    The only thing you will be achieving by creating a VLAN on the managed switch is stopping broadcast traffic going out the ports you have assigned as a VLAN other than the native.
     
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  13. LukeP

    LukeP Gigabyte Poster

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    Simple question:

    Can you assign multiple LAN IP's to the router? If you can't then it can't act as default gateway for 2 different LAN's.

    edit: Apologies Sparky, just noticed your post:oops:
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2010
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  14. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Hee hee! No probs mate.

    I had to do this with my last home lab to get two subnets to talk to each other. Worth noting that it made the router run quite slow and it reboot now and again, it was a crappy speed touch modem though.
     
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  15. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Cheers for shining a light on my setup. Goes to show I have a big gap in knowledge when it comes to setting up physical networking. I'm going to see if my routers will allow me to setup 2 gateways. If not can anyone recommend a good ADSL router that will allow me to do this setup.
     
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  16. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    I would go for a Cisco 877 SEC bundle if you could afford it(you might even get a second hand one off fleebay :)), great little router and it is packed with features
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2010
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  17. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    How can you tell if the router supports multiple gateways?
     
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  18. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yep it should do, as long as you can create a 2 VLAN interfaces.

    Craigie will be able to confirm this as he has used these a lot.
     
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  19. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    The lower 877 allow for 2 vlans and the Security bundle will allow upto 4 but you get more bang for your buck with the SEC-K9
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2010
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  20. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    or Thomas :)
     
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