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Server service...

Discussion in 'Windows Vista / 7 / 8 Client Exams' started by Jellyman_4eva, Feb 10, 2006.

  1. Jellyman_4eva

    Jellyman_4eva Byte Poster

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    Hi all,

    In an attempt to secure my XP Professional machine I have started reading up about the services... I have disabled a few with no problems...

    One of which was the Server service...

    Turned this off because after reading its description..

    OK, I have no printers or folders I want to share so I turn it off.

    No problems until yesterday I went to create a new account on the machine... it created the account fine, I then went to add the user to some groups and XP tells me I need the server service to do this?!

    Any idea as to actually why?!
     
    Certifications: MCDST, MCITP-EDST/EDA/EA/SA/ MCSA 2K3/2K8, MCSE+M 2K3/2K8, ISA/TMG, VCP3/4, CCNA, Exchange, SQL, Citrix, A+, N+, L+, Sec+, Ser+, JNCIA-SSL, JNCIS-SSL
    WIP: Lots
  2. d-Faktor
    Honorary Member

    d-Faktor R.I.P - gone but never forgotten.

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    i have no idea, but my guestimate is that it has to do with lsass (local security authority subsystem) requiring access to aforementioned named pipes, even if it only involves local accounts on a standalone machine.
     
  3. Jellyman_4eva

    Jellyman_4eva Byte Poster

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    OK... that was my other question...

    What exactly is a named pipe?!

    The only pipes I know are drain pipes and Linux pipes... oh and tobacco pipe...
     
    Certifications: MCDST, MCITP-EDST/EDA/EA/SA/ MCSA 2K3/2K8, MCSE+M 2K3/2K8, ISA/TMG, VCP3/4, CCNA, Exchange, SQL, Citrix, A+, N+, L+, Sec+, Ser+, JNCIA-SSL, JNCIS-SSL
    WIP: Lots
  4. d-Faktor
    Honorary Member

    d-Faktor R.I.P - gone but never forgotten.

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    in the windows world a named pipe is an interface, or a conduit if you will, that is used by computer processes to exchange data, mainly processes on seperate networked computers. such interface is only temporary, and it gets a name known to both parties, hence the term named pipes.

    a funny trivia is that although named pipes are so prevalent in networking services, it is actually running on a file system driver, namely npfs.sys (named pipe file system).

    more info:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Named_Pipes
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/?url=/library/en-us/ipc/base/named_pipes.asp
     
  5. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    *nix uses pipes too. I think, although I can't say for sure, that all OS's use them as applications need ways to communicate with each other and the OS. There's a reason the "|" (pipe) symbol is on all keyboards.

    If you ever work with Linux and the bash shell you will find that pipes are used constantly. The usage of a pipe allows you to use several *nix utilities in concert to accomplish work in a single line that would take many lines of code to accomplish otherwise.

    Here's a very simple example of how a pipe is used in *nix: ls -al | grep .txt.

    That will allow me to find all files with a .txt exension in the current directory and show all the attributes of each file. ls -al works like the dir command in dos or a cmd prompt in windows. grep searches for the string .txt. The combination of the two searches the current directory and finds only what I need.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1

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