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Problem Seperating my Home Network

Discussion in 'Networks' started by michael78, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Chaps I posted a thread a little while ago and hit a brick wall with finding a solution so needed fresh look at my problem so to speak. Now I'm going to have some time on my hands when my contract runs out I want to see if I can sort my setup out for the new year. I've attached a diagram of my setup (appologies if I have the symbols wrong) and what I want to do is to seperate my network to keep my non test rig PC's seperate from my test rig servers and put them on a different IP range/sub net using VLAN's so the traffic is seperate and the performance of my Openfiler SAN is the best it can be and doesn't hog all the bandwidth up. From my diagram if I insert a router and attach the managed and unmanaged switch to the router would I be able to achieve seperating my network?
     

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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  2. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I would just use a switch to create a VLAN. I don't think there's a need for a second router, it would complicate things more. Do you have layer 2 or layer 3 switches? This is what I actually did for my test lab at work.
     
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  3. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    SLM2008 to the rescue.

    Just VLAN the traffic and you're done.
     
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  4. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Simon cheers for the link mate. My Managed Switch does VLAN's so that is covered. Sorry guys made a bit of a hash as to what I'm trying to achieve. I was in such a rush yesterday I forgot to put the main reason why I want to do this. I also want to get my testing rig to use my DHCP/DNS servers to issue IP's to my test workstations and not my ISP router/modem. On the flip side I need to still have my standalone PC to use the router/modem to get it's IP address. For this reason I thought I would have to insert a router otherwise won't any workstations I try to join to the domain get it's IP's from the ISP router/modem and fail. I don't want to have to do static IP's for every workstation I need to join the domain.

    If I create 2 VLAN's and put my test rig on one and the separate PC on another and router the VLAN with my separate PC to my ISP's router/modem that should work whilst keeping my test rig on a separate enclosed environment. Shouldn't it :oops:
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2010
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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  5. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    What devices are you using as routers?

    It's all well and good having the switch which can do VLANs, but if you want to have both subnets accessing the internet, there will need to be a router capable of having an interface/subinterface on both subnets. Hosts on each subnet will need different default gateway addresses.
     
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  6. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    This is a quick diagram of how i would do it.

    The router here would support 802.1q trunking, which you would enable on the fast ethernet port. You would then create two sub interfaces, one for VLAN 1, and another for VLAN 2. This is called "router-on-a-stick" if you want to google and have a read about this setup. You can pick up a cheap Cisco router which would do this, btu i'm sure many other vendors have the same support.

    It all depends on what kit you have and whether you want to buy additional kit. If you are using those homeplugs, you will need to check they support 802.1q tags.
     

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  7. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    I haven't bought the router as I want to make sure it will work first. I thought that my ISP's router/modem should be fine and that a dedicated router should do the job as I put put an entry into it to route the traffic to my ISP router/modem.
     
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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  8. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Cheers mate will have a look. Due to the positioning on my Router/Modem I have to use the home plugs but will look to see if they will do the job.
     
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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  9. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Typical by the looks of it my Homeplugs aren't VLAN compatible so it looks like I'm back to my statement below.

    "I haven't bought the router as I want to make sure it will work first. I thought that my ISP's router/modem should be fine and that a dedicated router should do the job as I put put an entry into it to route the traffic to my ISP router/modem."
     
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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  10. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    anyone? Will my setup work for what I need as I figure it's cheaper to buy a router than a router and 3 homeplugs (which I use).
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  11. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    If you don't have homeplugs which are compatible with 802.1q, you can still use them to extend the network, just that the router will need another interface. See pic.
     

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  12. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Nice one mate, that's the setup I was looking to see if it would work. Will look for a compatible router.
     
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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  13. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    Give your standalone pc a static address pointing to your router for DNS etc, Then run a DHCP server for the rest of the network exclude the static IP of your homePC from the range.
     
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  14. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    It doesn't work as the other servers and workstations look to the ISP router for it's DHCP.
     
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    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  15. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    Just disable DHCP on your ISP router.
     
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