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self study or through training company?

Discussion in 'A+' started by digital3, May 26, 2009.

  1. digital3

    digital3 New Member

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    I am sorry if this has already been posted (I checked the stickys!)

    I rang pitman and skillstrain and looking into computeach and other websites....Is it worth going through them?
    Or can I just buy books and stuff and then book the test myself ?

    What would be more beneficial?
    Independently use self study materials to pass the A+ exams or
    go through some college / online company that would guide and provide me with materials.

    As it is, some of those companys are just too expensive, it wont be worth it if I am able to study it by myself....

    Has anyone else studied by themselves and passed? I saw the sticky about recommended materials to read but did u feel that the available self study guides covered enough to pass with no difficulties ?

    Thanks,
    digital3
     
  2. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    For your initial question training or self study, it totally depends on you and your style of learning. Some people do better self-studying, some people do better being taught.

    As for your questions on training providers, do research on them before you sign up. I would say contact your local college first of all, as for private training companies - there are good and bad ones out there.

    IMO, I would try the self study route first of all and then if that doesn't work for you, then do the course, at least that is what I would recommend for the A+.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  3. DaveyB1981

    DaveyB1981 Byte Poster

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    Oh this debate again... :D

    Basically, it is down to yourself. If you feel you have the discipline to learn yourself, then i would give it strong consideration. I never sat the A+ myself but there seems to be some really good resources for it and if you can get your hands on some old hardware to play about with then you should get on well.

    On the flipside, you may benefit from the classroom environment.

    My take, get a book and an old pc and see how you get on. If it isnt for you you haven't lost much. It seems to work for most people here.

    Good luck with your studies.

    Dave
     
    Certifications: CISMP, ITIL Fdn, MCDST
    WIP: the day job...
  4. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    you can study with someone who will essentially give you some books and charge you a hell of a lot of money for it or you can get the books and study yourself.

    You will find the majority of people on here have self studied since it is cheaper and can be done at your own pace.

    All my certs have been done by self study if I can do it then you can too:D

    For the A+ all you need is a pc you can take to bits and put back together and compTIA A+ all in one exam guide 6th edition by Mike Meyes and PC Technician street smarts by James Pyles.

    Just to add the A+ exam will change to the 2009 edition later in the year so you would need to buy the 7th edition of the Mike Meyers book when it is released.

    When you book your exams through www.pearsonvue.com you will find your nearest test center and you will be able to state wether you are doing the 2007 A+ objectives or 2009 objectives.

    The A+ is for life so it does not matter wether your doing the 2007 or 2009.

    YOu can also buy discount vouchers (must be international ones) from www.gracetechsolutions.com you use the voucher codes when booking both exams instead of your credit card.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  5. psotek

    psotek Bit Poster

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    If you've a bit experience with hardware & software (windows) you can try found any ebooks on net, read it and remember then try check your knowledge with any self test machines (sybex, examcram,total tester etc...) after you can answer that you ready or not. Its important try test machines cos of question are simllary on real exam (of course not the same) but you will know whats you can see on. elearn companies charge a lots £££ for learning so before try by yourself

    psotek
     
    Certifications: A+.MCDST
    WIP: 70-621
  6. DaveyB1981

    DaveyB1981 Byte Poster

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    Lol - what is it they say about great minds, Ken? :D

    Dave
     
    Certifications: CISMP, ITIL Fdn, MCDST
    WIP: the day job...
  7. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Are you refering to : "when one goes on a murdeous rampage, the other one covers" or the one that ends in "think alike"? :twisted: :biggrin

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  8. digital3

    digital3 New Member

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    Yeah I am all for self study!
    Although I worried about the practical bit, in terms of taking apart an old PC. Can't I just watch a posted video or something when it comes to that?
     
  9. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    you could indeed watch a video on youtube or soemthing where a pc is taken apart or built but you would learn better by doing.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  10. Rheinkraft

    Rheinkraft Bit Poster

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    I was stuck with this dilemer recently but after browsing through these forums im going to give the self study a go. Lets face it theres nothing to lose this way and I know for a fact home learning charge £1775 for pretty much the same thing!

    If all else fails then maybe classroom work would be the answer, but im going to give it my best shot at self study.

    Just orderd the Mike Meyers 6th edition :)

    Rhein
     
  11. digital3

    digital3 New Member

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    Good for you Rheinkraft!


    I've had a little rethink....my fears are beginning to get the better of me. I am kinda scared of doing everything through self study (the practical bit just freaks me out) so I think I'll do the first part (A+ essentials) through self study. The second part...I dunno, I guess I'll see what happens.

    Anyway thanks for the help everyone. All of your replies is much appreciated! :D
     
  12. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    For the practicle side of things I already had experience in building PCs before but I went to the nearby recycling center and got a PC for £60, I know someone who got one from a pawn shop for £40.

    The pc you get doesn't have to be the latest and greatest thing.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  13. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    It's best to get some practice in on an old PC where the components, downtime and data are worth comparatively nothing compared to a business environment. Much better to makes your mistakes now, when it'll only cost you some of your own time and maybe a little cash to learn from your mistakes. Make the same mistakes in a job and you could quickly find yourself looking for a new one.
    Fortunately you don't need to know how to solder or anything like that, it's all just plugging things in basically, the trick being to know which thing to plug in where (and why). Oh, and screws. Lots of screws.

    Do what GBL said and get yourself a cheap/free PC. I've not read PC Tech Street Smarts, because I was fairly confident on the practical side of things having spent more years than I care to remember prodding about inside electrical equipment, but as I understand it, it runs you through a lot of practical exercises based on common tasks that techs have to perform. Sounds like just what you need to build up your confidence on that side of things.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  14. digital3

    digital3 New Member

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    Yeah I am sure I can find some old pc somewhere to practice on...

    When you come from a non-IT background, those chipboard things look so damn complicated. If its just slotting in things then maybe I can liken it to lego? (my noobness reeks doesn't it?)

    I went to Waterstones today and of all the books, the one they didn't have in stock was the mike meyers all in one 6th ed. I saw the PC Tech Street Smarts book and it looked relatively thin to my delight, so I'll give that a go.

    Well I am gonna start my reading now...If I run into anything I don't understand I'll be sure to ask you guys, my fellow IT gurus!

    Wish me luck :rolleyes:
    *Runs head first into the battlefield*
     
  15. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    you will still need the Meyers book and this book isn't small 1136 pages to be exact :D
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?

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