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Seduced by the Dark Side...

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by noelg24, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    Yes that's right...I am now thinking of looking for parts for a new PC for moi...

    This time though and thanks to some serious hinting from Raffaz :tongue: :twisted: I am going for Intel...yes u heard right Intel...but this is going to be a new gaming machine which wont be built until about end of the year...but I thought I would ask...with regards to Intel CPUs and motherboards...what do I need to look for in order to get maximum compatibility? So far I have seen mobos saying different chipsets...are these relevant to the CPUs? I am going for C2Q roughly in the price range of about £150 (but then come end of the year I am hoping some of the more pricey ones will come down in price :biggrin

    Then hopefully before I build the gaming machine I am wanting to build a new main machine but using the AMD/ATI Spider platform (say what you want but thats what I am doing) lol...

    As yet I dont know what I will do with my two current machines when they have been replaced...I may sell them but I may just keep them as I am a greedy bugger and I built them both :biggrin

    Your help is much appreciated...(now begins the onslaugh, this should be fun hehe)
     
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  2. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    AMD had the market from the P3 up until intel released the c2d and AMD just havent got a reply to it. the c2d still runs apps marginally better than the quad but the quad renders so so much quicker. now that intel have released the native quad core things should start to change though although you'll be paying for that provilege

    grim
     
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  3. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    hence why I am waiting until the end of the year before buying my parts bit by bit...but I need to know about the chipsets in relation to the CPUs...
     
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  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    :eek:I wouldn't buy bits, 'bit by bit'. You'll save on postage on fewer orders, plus although parts are supposed to be compatible some are more compatible than others, by buying all the parts from a few vendors at the same time to the same spec you have far less issues.

    You can assemble them all test them all together and return any dodgy parts within any notice or warrantly periods.

    You want to buy the best complete system at time of purchase, not find that you can't install the latest whiz bang kit because your 6 month old mobo isn't up to scratch. The motherboards can be the most critical part and determines ultimately what the system can do. You also can't buy the other parts really untill you've decided on a motherboard. The components are also price sensitive so you don't want to hold them on a shelf while they depreciate.

    Why on earth would you need four systems ? :eek:

    This sounds like a serious case of upgrade fever ! :biggrin

    Anything you buy today with be out of date in 6 months time, just enjoy using the stuff to do something...

    Why don't you make one of these...

    http://www.clustermonkey.net/content/view/211/1/
     
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  5. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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  6. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    GBL...if u were a hot looking woman I could kiss u right now :biggrin thats the kind of Mobo I was expecting plus it has ATI Crossfire...u have made my day :biggrin

    dmarsh...I have always bought stuff bit by bit and I have had no issue (apart from when my PSU blew up two months later but that was different) plus I can get my parts replaced during the first 12mths anyway whether it be the manufacturer or the POS (Point Of Sale) as has been proved by the PSU that blew up 2mths after I bought it and also a sound card 6mths after I bought it...ebuyer replaced them both without a hassle...also the other reason I buy bit by bit is cos my wage only allows me to buy bit by bit which I prefer that way I know what to spend and how much I can spend...rather than save up and wait cos I like to catch a bargain when I can...
     
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  7. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    if you have plenty of cash get the superior model that does DDR3.
     
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  8. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    we'll see how my budget can stretch come the end of the year :biggrin
     
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  9. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    Noel, being a kit geek myself I know how you feel
    but let me explain how I do things now (when I cant afford them outright)

    Open a saving account at the bank
    set yourself budgets for each component, put the money in there when you have the full ammount
    say.. 300 for graphics.. 150 for processor..
    when you get 300 you pay in, when you have 150 you pay in (making 450)
    come the end of the year when you have enough for a working system, buy it!
    you will benefit from the kit you wanted having come down in price, and perhaps even get better, and you can get it all in one go and build it,
    its a much more satisfying way of doing it I find
    from a financial perspective the bonus is a) im earning interest not watching kit depreciate, b) if the **** hits the fan I can tuck into it if needed, sort of a second emergancy fund
     
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  10. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    hmmm now that sounds a like a plan sir...i may employ such strategy in the future. thank you :biggrin
     
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  11. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I want to build a gaming PC for the longest time. I just never really had the time to research much and save up the money for it. I am really thinking of doing it probably by the end of the year since I do have an outdated system. I think the only reason that I haven't updated is because I have an Xbox 360.

    All that aside, I am probably going to go with the Intel Quad core 6600 or 9450 when the prices go down a little. I am also thinking of going with the 780i chipset motherboard.
     
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  12. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    Good financial advice :)
     
  13. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    This is what I am doing, as I am saving up for a £1500 beast :)
     
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  14. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

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    If you’re going to run a Core 2 your best getting an Intel chipset, either P35 or X38. I spent a long time looking in to this before deciding on my P5K Premium. I would say only go for Nvidia chipsets if you want to use SLI (no choice really, you can’t SLI on any other platform), X38 has native DDR3 support, same Southbridge as the P35 boards, but a bit more expensive.
     
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  15. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Ryan's "savings plan" is *definitely* the way to go. :thumbleft
     
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  16. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    Thank you all...I shall start saving very soon then once I have at least £800-£900 then I will be set to start buying...:biggrin
     
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  17. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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  18. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Hmmm, i personally dont agree with this. Most of the performance testing that has been done in mags say that there is only marginal speed increases with DDR3, so its not worth the extra cost. I know people are going to say that if Noel buys a DDR3 board it will be futureproof, but to be fair i dont think this applies to Noel as he will have a new build about 6 months later!:rolleyes:
     
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  19. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Ya might also wannna pick up this months PCPRO coz theres a CPU megatest in there.:)
     
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  20. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Futureproofings overated, thats why i made my earlier points, theres often subtle changes in specs.

    Look at USB, it took about 2 years for it to become usable, I had at least two motherboards that proported to support early versions of the spec that were useless...

    Even if you do manage to maintain interop you will often find as an early adopter you pay more for less, the spec improves and you're stuck in 'compatibility' mode...

    Similar things also happen with upgrading, its not the panacea people make out, thats why people often go for new builds, its more cost effective after even a few technology changes. Also its the computer equivalent of this years new car reg, your older kit will depreciate rapidly after one or two technology changes.

    Thats why my advice is buy a set of components at the same time that are proven to work together the day you buy them.

    I'd also then advise trying to use and enjoy your kit for 2-3 years and trying to avoid churn.
     
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