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RIS Error

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Boycie, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Set up RIS on my home Domain :)

    Both Clients have onboard 10/100 and therefore *hit F12 for network install*.

    The Laptop does sync up with the RIS server, whilst the other does not.
    I have trawled through a fair bit on the subject and have hit a dead end.
    Although i haven't followed the procedure all the way with the successful client it asks for the username and password for the share to the name of my server. On doing so, it warns me that it must format my drive to install the Operating System so I assume that it would proceed OK.

    The other client does recieve an IP from the RIS but errors out with <PXE-MOF: Exiting PXE ROM. Reboot and select proper boot device>

    I have gone in to the options which flashes up as soon as you hit F12 and these are;

    Network Boot Protocol: PXE
    Boot Order: Int 19h, PnP/BEV (BBS), ROM Disable, Int 18h,
    Show Config message: enable, disable
    Show message time: 3, 5, or 8 seconds

    RIS installed without any problems, and I have since run the wizard selecting the option <check for errors> and none were found. I also restarted the RIS service.
    Event viewer has one listing stating that the service was started and ready.

    Any ideas guy's and girls?

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  2. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Have you tried booting from the RIS boot disc? Last time I setup a RIS server I just couldn’t get it to work booting from the NIC (it was PXE compatible) but when I tried the boot disc it worked ok. 8)
     
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  3. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Hi Spark,

    Yes, i did try that and it reported that the NIC wasn't compatible. Looking at the list when I created the floppy it is only 3comm and a few HP's on there. I take it will support others not listed?

    Si
     
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  4. UCHEEKYMONKEY
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    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    first of all boyce what type is the lan card.

    RIS only works on certain type of LAN/NIC cards.
    Realtrek are normaly the ones designed for RIS, I have tried SMC and they don't work.

    Secondly the password required in the RIS setup machine is normally the admistrator password used in windows.

    Have you checked the mac address and GUID is correct?

    have you checked your boot setup?

    first boot = floppy
    second boot = LAN
    Third Boot = Hard drive

    check to see if the bios supports PXE if not you might have to upgrade the bios.
     
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  5. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    first of all boyce what type is the lan card.

    Intel (onboard)

    RIS only works on certain type of LAN/NIC cards.
    Realtrek are normaly the ones designed for RIS, I have tried SMC and they don't work.

    Fair comment, this is what I assume is the problem.

    Secondly the password required in the RIS setup machine is normally the admistrator password used in windows.

    Yes, but i cannot get this far on the other machine.

    Have you checked the mac address and GUID is correct?

    The MAC is displaying correct, I can ping the address it displays from the RIS. How can I refer the GUID to anything? :oops:

    have you checked your boot setup?

    first boot = floppy
    second boot = LAN
    Third Boot = Hard drive

    check to see if the bios supports PXE if not you might have to upgrade the bios.

    The boot setup is correct otherwise I would not be getting to the Network boot screen. Yes, the BIOS supports PXE.


    Regards

    Si
     
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  6. UCHEEKYMONKEY
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    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    YIKES:ohmy oh no 3comm are a nightmare get a realtek there less than a tenner and come with floppy - software.

    We use RIS at work on daily basis.

    Normally you RIS with a RIS disk to get the mac address and guid once you have this you then bind them to the server so it nows where to find the ip address.

    you still need the disk after binding, but some of the modern boards have PXE bootup in the bioas so all you really have to do is look out for the F12 on the screen.

    For instruction on how to use RIS

    Click here

    Best practices for Remote Installation Services:biggrin
     
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  7. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    UCM,

    Thanks for your reply with links :thumbleft

    When you say you use RIS on a daily basis, does your company re-image machines every three months or so? Do you put office and <all that> on too?

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  8. UCHEEKYMONKEY
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    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    TO quote ms:-

    To locate the GUID for client computers
    • The computer's globally unique identifier (GUID) (sometimes called the universally unique identifier [UUID]) appears in the following areas:

    • A label on the side of the computer case.

    • A label within the computer case.

    • The basic input/output system (BIOS) of the client computer. You can collect this information through the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) interface by using the universally unique identifier (UUID) value of the Win32_ComputerSystemProduct class. For more information about this, see the MSDN Library at the Microsoft Web site.

    • Network traffic from the client computer. You can use a network utility to sniff the network traffic and locate the DHCPDiscover packet; within that field will be the 128-bit, 16-byte GUID/UUID.
     
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  9. UCHEEKYMONKEY
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    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    Everyday Si, I build - RIS PC's 3 a day, when networks are working. There are over 4000 PC in the NHS with over 50% that do not have an AD account so will have to RIS. I thought if PC's don't have the latest operating system such as WinXP SP2 on them then they are not AD.

    This is not true, to find out if a PC is AD or not we need to know the GUID, no GUID then no AD.

    The other problem I have encounted is these RIS images are only based on intel processors and not AMD. The only way around this is to slipstream windows:rolleyes:
     
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  10. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    AFAIK (in Windows 2000) you only need the MAC address if you are pre-staging a RIS install, ie you do not want any old box to pick up the image, you want a specific box/s to pick up the image.

    You must have properly configured DHCP, AD, DNS and RIS server for this to work.

    The RIS image is an image of Windows XP and hence should not be processor dependant.

    If using a RIS boot disk, the NIC must be on the HCL (hardware compatibility list) or it won't work.

    If the motherboard/built in NIC is PXE compliant it should work as this is a standard.

    If you are picking up an IP address and the install is starting, you are well on your way. Check out google for troubleshooting RIS.
     
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  11. UCHEEKYMONKEY
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    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    I thought you said you were going to stop using slang - Pete?

    What does AFAIK mean?

    oh eck does this mean I got to go over to wiki to find out?:rolleyes:

    Thanks for the link BTW.

    Actually your right it should not be processor dependant. but for some reason the trust only buys intel processors. This one I am building now is an exception.

    I think this is what make's working in an IT dept. So Difficult:(
    Doctors, Consultants who buy and bring into work their own laptops, PC and Palm tops. Palm tops are the worst!!!!
    They don't always sinc with Windows. As for RIS PC's and laptops with unsupported RIS NIC. It's a pain in the butt.

    The catch 22 is the equipment is used for work, but not owned by the trust.

    Therefore should the IT department still offer a service to users who have their own Laptop or palm top?
    As they say it is used for work, but not own buy the Trust?

    What do you think?
     
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  12. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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  13. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Firstly I never said anything of the sort - I was referring to l33t speak, which is made up almost entirely of shortened words and abbreviations, as used in chat rooms and by crackers. As far as I know, AFAIK means just that! :D
     
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