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Rhyming Slang

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by tripwire45, Aug 15, 2005.

  1. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    This got started in another thread but my dearest TNT also mentioned it to me. We were watching the remake of "Oceans Eleven" and one of the British characters was using rhyming slang. We were both wondering about it and how anyone would be able to figure out if a person said "Barney Rubble" it meant that they were in "trouble"? :blink

    Let the lessons begin. :tongue
     
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  2. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Sky Diver - a five pound note.

    Ruby Murray (generally just a Ruby) - a curry

    Britney Spears - a collection of fine ales.

    Gas Cooker - like pool, ball game played on green baize (sp ?) 15 reds, and 6 colours to be potted in sequence.

    Just a few to start with. A few I best not mention are Gladys Night, Lillian Gish, and Ravi Shankar :oops:

    EDIT: Trouble is actually "soapy bubble", Trip.
     
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  3. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    You mean snooker?
     
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  4. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Trip the strange thing is that people use the words without even thinking that they are rhyming slang. Quite often just half the phrase as Jak pointed out with ruby.

    This might help, it's not all rhyming slang but it is fairly comprehensive and accurate. So get yourself a bevvy and have a butchers :biggrin

    here

    Pete

    PS the word Barney is used for having an argument, as in, those tramps in Peckham Rye were having a right barney. But I think that usage has evolved over time.
     
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  5. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I guess he does Freddy but I have to say that throughout my misspent youth I never came across that one. Probably because the way Londoners say cooker does not rhyme with snooker, it's probably a northerners thing as they pronounce cooker with a long cooo :)

    Pete
     
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  6. Arroryn
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    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    Does that mean Barney Rubble has gone regional? I do a Barney Rubble when I either have a double drink of something, or double a ball in a game of pool.
     
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  7. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    thats true Bluerinse

    Berk is an acceptable dig at somebody, but its true meaning is much MUCH ruder if you know what its rhyming slag is :)
     
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  8. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    As we have discussed this on MSN in the past, Ryan - I must thank you for sparing the Forum, We'd have been Donald Ducked if you'd elaborated ! :biggrin

    As for gas cooker - this is akin to what Arroryn describes, in terms of regionalisation, gas cooker is a very west coast Scotland saying, and probably not even understood in Edinburgh (but then they're weird over there)

    And just a FYI - "bevvy" isn't rhyming slang - it's an abbreviation of beverage. Neither is "barney", but I don't know off-hand the derivation.
     
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  9. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Even TNT is going to "get" the meaning of "Donald Ducked". :blink
     
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  10. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Ooops - should I have said Daffy instead ? :oops:


    and do NOT even think about going there, Trip ...:biggrin
     
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  11. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Say that with a little respect.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Damn, that's good - but GODDAMMIT - I am not rising to it !!! :biggrin
     
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  13. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    RABBIT SEASON!!!

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  14. ginge

    ginge Bit Poster

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    Being a Londoner, I've been brought up with rhyming slang, mainly my dad and uncles generation are the ones who have used it for donkeys (ears -> years), it is second nature to those that have used it for so long. I don't admit to using it myself, although I find myself using little bits here and there. Pony (and trap -> cr*p) is one that I cannot remove from my vocabulary, it's been there since I was a little boy and its there to stay.

    Advanced cockney rhyming slang is something to confuse people.

    Aris = bum. How?

    Aris(totle) = bottle -> bottle & glass = ar*e

    Ever heard the expression "he lost his bottle", well now you know where it comes from 8)

    Even I get confused sometimes. For years, I didn't know what a "Mars Bar" was (scar).


    Would also like to point out that a lot of this new "Cockney" rhyming slang originates from recent years, Britney Spears for "beers" is a good example, and it has very little to do with Cockneys or London, newer rhyming slang and those who use it in their speech are known as "Mockneys". Jamie Oliver is one such person!
     
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  15. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    blow off v. Blowing off in the UK is not at all similar to blowing off in the US. While Americans know it as brushing someone off, British people use it as an alternative term for breaking wind.

    Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha
    Ha Ha Ha
    Ha Ha Ha Ha
    Ha Ha
    Ha

    Oh, how childish I feel right now.
     
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