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Resume Question

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Veteran's son, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. Veteran's son

    Veteran's son Megabyte Poster

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    Hello Everyone:

    I am in the process of updating my
    resume and have a question please.

    Should I have a separate section for IT certifications?
    If so, should I state the year that I received the
    IT certification and just name the certification itself?

    What is the best way to acknowledge this certification
    as I want it to stand out on the resume?

    Again, your advice/information/comments would
    be most appreciated please. :)

    Thank You!
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+
  2. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    The way that I do it is to simply name the certification, and then afterwards say what exams I've passed. No dates or anything, e.g.

    Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator
    Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Tech
    Microsoft Certified Professional

    Installing and configuring w2k....
    Implementing and supporting .....
    XYZ..........

    The reaon that i put all of my accreditations on is that recruiters are sometimes looking for a specific title, e.g. MCP and as they aren't always knowledgable they don't always realise that to be an MCSA you have to already be an MCP.

    HTH

    8)
     
  3. d-Faktor
    Honorary Member

    d-Faktor R.I.P - gone but never forgotten.

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    mine is similar to simons. (in a seperate it certs section) i first have a list with the general cert names, and then i provide a list of the seperate exams. i did include the dates, because i have dated most other things on my resume as well.

    i do have to say that sometimes you see a resume where the applicant has also included a section of technologies he/she is proficient at. for instance, i myself have experience, sometimes a lot, sometimes just basic, in things like hp-ux, banyan vines, programming etc. etc., but i have no certs for them. i have never included my knowledge about other technologies on my resume, because i feel it's simply too vague, and the recruiter would have to take my word for it. depending on such list, it can also come accross as arrogant. so be careful if you want to include such list.
     
  4. Veteran's son

    Veteran's son Megabyte Poster

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    Thank you for your replies! :)
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+
  5. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Guess I'm a bit different. Here's how the start of my resume is formatted:

    I state the certs right up front. I do have a separate section at the end of my resume for my education.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. Veteran's son

    Veteran's son Megabyte Poster

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    Hello Again Everyone:

    I didn't want to start a new thread so
    I am asking these questions in the current
    thread.

    I have updated my resume and so
    now it is time to develop a cover letter. :eek:

    So, I(yet again :oops: ) have a few questions
    please.

    Since I will be applying for entry-level IT
    jobs, wouldn't the cover letter be pretty
    much the same for all jobs applied for?

    Does anyone have an example of a cover
    letter format which helped them obtain
    employment?

    Your comments/advice are appreciated! :)
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+
  7. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Actually, the cover letter is where you get to specifically address the company. Sure, you can have different types of resumes depending on the job you are applying for, but the cover letter lets you address people by name, tell them what attracts you to their company and specifically why you want to work for them.

    No cookie cutter form letters. Remember, they read these things by the thousands. Don't write another boring cover letter that could have been addressed to any company anywhere.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  8. sneezie

    sneezie Nibble Poster

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    All the the IT jobs I'd applied for are online and through recruitment agencies. I just have to fill out the online form and attach my CV. So I don't even get the chance to write a cover letter! Duno whether that's a good thing or a bad thing.

    Great advice from tripwire45. Make sure you sound enthusiastic. You can do a search on google for sample cover letters and see how to lay it out.

    Good luck with the job hunting! Hope u get a job soon, fingers cross for you :D
     
    Certifications: Degree
    WIP: MCAD in vb.net
  9. Veteran's son

    Veteran's son Megabyte Poster

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    Thanks for the advice sneezie, trip, simongrahamuk and d-Faktor! :)

    I really appreciate your helpful and encouraging responses! :D

    I am going to send out my newly updated resume in the hope
    of obtaining entry-level IT employment! :super
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+
  10. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    ALWAYS customize your cover letter!
    (This is the HR in me talking).

    Never trot out something that reads like it has been mass produced (Dear Sir/Madam, I would like a job with your company...) because when you have a pile of them on your desk they read like spam. You realise that someone has just sent their CV to 100 companies without putting any thought into it.

    You need to engage the reader. Start off by finding out a name. If it isn't in the ad, phone the company and find out who you need to send your CV to, or who the manager is. Usually CVs will go to a Joe average who will filter them before giving them to someone more important.
    Sending yours directly to the manager may seem a bit cheeky. All he's going to do is give it to Joe to put with the rest of them. But as far as Joe is concerned, it has come from his boss then...

    Make sure the covering letter mirrors the advert. If a company is looking for a specific role, make sure you apply for that and mention briefly any experience or skills you have that suit you to that specific role. If they ask for specific certs or qualifications, list them clearly (if you have them) in the same order they are listed in the ad.

    It can be quite depressing to get hundreds of applications to a job, each one with a generic covering letter begging for any kind of job in the 'IT department' or whatever. None of them actually seem to say exactly what the applicant has to offer, and employers aren't there to do you any favours.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  11. Veteran's son

    Veteran's son Megabyte Poster

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    Thanks for the reply, Jonny! :)
    There is some great information there, thanks!
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+

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