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Resume, CbtNuggets (MCITP)

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by sorrybadbeat, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. sorrybadbeat

    sorrybadbeat New Member

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    I am new to the site, so first and foremost I want to say hello to everyone.I have been working in customer support in Canada for about five years and I basically bounced around at a few jobs because I was unsatisfied with the pay.I took some time away to see if I like manual labor better and I found that it has been very hard for me to find work in that field, because of lack of experience I imagine.Anyway, reflecting at my short career in the IT industry, I realized that I never really gave it a solid effort.I have never had any complaints from a boss regarding performance while working but I never pushed my self and would find myself board after a year to a couple years and move on.

    I am writing this because as a 27 year old who has seen that the grass is not greener on the other side;I am ready to give it an honest shot this time.I am planning on writing a few MCITP, certifications and I am wondering two things:

    1).What exam should I write first out of the following.I am planning on writing them all eventually.

    Windows Client

    MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    Exam 70-680
    Exam 70-685
    MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7
    Exam 70-680
    Exam 70-686
    MCITP: Consumer Support Technician on Windows Vista
    Exam 70-620
    Exam 70-623
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician on Windows Vista
    Exam 70-620
    Exam 70-622

    2).How long do you think it will take to study for each exam?Do I have to write them both one after another or can I write one exam one day and one the next.Also as far as training is concerned I am planning on using CbtNuggets.Are they any good?

    Also, one last thing.If you wouldn't mind taking a look at my resume and just giving me some suggestions.Thanks for the help!
     
  2. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    Personally I would ditch plans to do the Vista certs. Mainstream support for Vista ends in April next year and it's market share has been declining since the release of Windows 7.
    You might want to think about getting some of the basics under your belt first, fill in the gaps a bit and get you back up to speed. The CompTIA A+ and Network+ are worth looking at for that.
    The 70-680 and 70-685 are probably the best client certs to aim for initially, although if you have good experience in XP you should maybe consider the 70-270 as well. Extended support ends for XP in 2014, so between now and then a lot of companies will favour someone with knowledge of both as they roll out Windows 7.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  3. sorrybadbeat

    sorrybadbeat New Member

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    Thanks for the response, soundian.I will definitely take your advice in regards to no doing the Windows Vista exams.As far as the CompTIA A+ goes, how hard is that to pass?Is it something I could study for and pass on my own through CBT Nuggets?I definitely wanted to get my MCDST for the XP certifications and I though that the XP exams had been retired, so thanks for the information.Did you take a look at my resume?What were your initial impressions of it?
     
  4. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    I have to be honest and advise you not to go for the MCITP because the basic premise for the ITP exams is that you're already an IT Professional with 12 - 18 months experience in your subject matter.

    I would get something like an OS MCTS and look at exams like the Comptia A+ and N+ to get you some decent knowledge, once you have some more experience in desktop support then look at expanding to the MCITP.

    I would also consider lessening the information about your non IT related roles and put more emphesis on the IT side of things, if I were hiring I really don't care that you were a security guard, I want to know what your IT skills are, I would also think twice about hiring someone with a large number of certifications that didn't appear to have the experience to back them up (yes, I have a lot of certifications listed below, I also have 13 solid years of working in IT to back it up).

    What I am trying to say is don't try and run before you can walk, sometimes having too many exams can actually harm your career chances if you have too many exams and not enough experience.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  5. sorrybadbeat

    sorrybadbeat New Member

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    I have about four years of TSS experience. How much is enough? I never quit any job because it was too hard or anything like that. I have always been an above average tech support agent, wherever I have worked.

    Thanks for the advice about excluding the security job.

    Do you have any other suggestions or observations?
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011

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