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Remote Access?

Discussion in 'Internet, Connectivity and Communications' started by noelg24, Jul 30, 2004.

  1. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    Now unless I am being really thick here but I may as well ask. Lou sent me an email yesterday from one of her workmates. It states that she and her fella are both looking after her daughter's house while her daughter and her boyfriend are away this weekend. the thing is Lou's mates fella is on call and will have his laptop with him all weekend this means he needs to connect to the internet. the problem is all his connections are at his house and the house they will be at has no internet connection whatsoever. Now am I right in thinking that unless the house has internet connection of some sort then there is no chance in hell he will be able to do any kind of remote connection to his internet connection in house? Now I havent asked if he has a PC at home but I have been to his house and I didnt see one. If he does have a PC at home he can use Remote Assistant or something along those lines...also what about the software called PC Anywhere...would that help? Any ideas please guys. And I dont think wireless will do as the house has no Wireless Access Points at all.
     
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  2. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    why would you do a remote connection to an internet connection??

    no if he has no net connection he cant get on the internet
    or do remote access to other machines
     
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  3. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    If he has the laptop with him doesn't it have a modem in it? If it has then he could just set up an internet connection from that, assuming there's a phone line in the house of course :)
     
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  4. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    Thats the problem Phil there isnt an internet connection in that house only in his house...but the modem is in the laptop...so really he's screwed...we'll leave it there but thanks guys...
     
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  5. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    The internet connection is on the machine. All he has to do is connect his modem into the phone line and click "Connect" and there you go, internet connection.

    The connection is via the PC not the place of connection (although is RAS policies are stating that call back is in force, this may be a problem).
     
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  6. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    So long as there is a phone line in the house and he has all the phone cables and modem etc he should be fine...right thanks guys...:D
     
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  7. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    So why does my ISP say that if I change address, I'll be charged £50 for reconnection.
    It must be different for broadband, over dial-up then?

    Why?
     
  8. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    Because with dial up all you need is a phone line as to with ADSL...the line has to be ADSL enabled to begin with and if the exchange has not been enabled you would have to put with dial up until the exchange has become available on ADSL..
     
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  9. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    That'll be because they need to enable the line for broadband from the exchange whereas with dial up net access all you need is an ordinary phone line. I'm sure Gav would be better able to give you an explanation of what is done on the echange end.
     
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  10. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yeah, but what if the new address is in an ADSL enabled area, right up the road from an exchange.

    Surely all they have to do is flick a button or something, if anything at all, to enable you to have access.

    There should be a way whereby they can limit how many connections your using ie/ so that your not buying one connection for your whole street to share lol.
     
  11. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    I'll give a rough idea of that...what they do is they have whats known as ADSL exchange cards...think of them as sound and graphics cards for PCs..you have a 3yr old PC system thats not giving out good graphics so you want to be able to play the latest games so what do you do throw away the old one and get yourself a brand spankin new one. its sort of them same with ADSL and dial up..you cant be bothered with slow connection so you have to find out if your area has ADSL and if it does bingo if not then you have to wait abit like graphics card again if your system cant take the card you have to upgrade the whole PC. so I think you get my drift. I work for BT so I think I know what I mean here and I use to work for their broadband side too.
     
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  12. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    Not a chance in hell Flex mate. if you move address you have to start up a new account. now if your taking you telephone number with you I dont think that will make a difference as far as ADSL providers go you're a new customer when you move property. I have had people ring up BT faults about this and keep telling them to go back to their ISP as its nowt to do with us. and if it is then we'll do what we can to sort it.
     
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  13. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Right so they stick a card in a slot, and that costs about 50 quid.

    Thanks for clearing that up, as I like to know where my pennies are going.
     
  14. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    LOL @ Flex :D :D :D
     
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  15. noelg24

    noelg24 Terabyte Poster

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    You cant blame him Aj...after £50 is a lot...but Flex its almost the same as upgrading a new graphics card unless you really wana splash out...
     
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  16. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    :scratch ..........................................................
     
  17. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    ?????????????
     
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  18. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Think of the ADSL as being applied to the physical copper wires between your house and your exchange. Although you may move and take your number, you do not take those wires with you when you go.

    At the exchange, a Virtual Path (VP) is then configured, to which around 50 ADSL connections can be enabled. When one of these fills up, another one has to be added, etc.

    The steps in actually enabling and implementing ADSL are more complicated than just throwing in a card. The order from the EU is first checked for ADSL activity on their exchange, then sent to your ISP's provisioning department. If all checks out fine so far, it is then sent to BT wholesale, who physically connect your line to the VP. Generally speaking, all ADSL orders are currently implemented at 2Mb, then throttled down to say 1Mb or 512, whichever you ordered, and relevant contention ratio applied (generally 50:1 or 20:1)

    BT then hand this provisioned line back to your ISP, where they then apply your account details and "hand it over" to you. VIOLA - you have broadband.

    A regards dial-up, few modern accounts will specifiy a fixed CLI (caller line identification - your phone number), although many older packages still operate on a fixed CLI. You ISP will easily change this CLI for you if you move house.

    HTH :D
     
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  19. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yeah but they're not laying down new wires are they?
    They use the exisiting wires which have maybe been in the ground for a few years.
    So house A has had a phone line with wires for 15 years, and so has house B.

    So what's the difference, I don't get that bit.Why does that matter?

    And if house A and house B both already have their exchanges ADSL enabled, then if we move from house A to B, what are we paying for.

    Sure they've gotta initialize something, but if ADSL is already up on the exchange, it should be more simple.

    Also, it's not like the person moving into your house gets your broadband when you leave.
    I mean I've paid my initial connection charge of about 50 quid already, so why should I have to pay it again if I move.
    A small charge maybe, but not something like 30 quid plus on top of monthly fees anyway :blink
     
  20. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Believe it or not, Flex - that is exactly the case if the person leaving does not cancel. The line is "tagged" for ADSL by the ISP, which gets removed when they cancel.

    You need to grasp the idea that it is the actual wires you could (in theory) hold in your hand from that house to the VP at the exchange that is that broadband line.

    I know it's a wee bit complicated, and we get Lord knows how many people kicking off that they have to pay activation fees again when moving. This is known as a Cease and Re-provide.

    There are, as explained before, several stages, and personnel, involved in configuring ADSL on a phone line, and that aint gonna be cheap, I'm afraid.
     
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