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Random Linux+ Question #8

Discussion in 'Linux+' started by tripwire45, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    You are on the command line on a Linux computer. You have been navagating the file system using the cd command. You have returned to your home directory but suddenly remembered that you want to see something in the last directory you had visited. You cannot remember exactly how to get back there. What simple command can you issue that will take you to the last directory you visited? Choose only one answer

    1. cd
    2. cd ..
    3. cd ~
    4. cd ~-
    5. cd -

    Answer later.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  2. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    Not a clue but 5 looks promising 8)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCSA (messaging), ITIL Foundation v3
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  3. nugget
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    nugget Junior toady

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    Number 2 for me.:rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP (270,271,272,290,620) | MCDST | MCTS:Vista
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  4. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    2 for me.
     
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  5. EMacd

    EMacd Bit Poster

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    5 for this one
     
  6. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I may have shot myself in the foot with this one. There apparently are two correct answers. The answer that I was going for was 4.: cd ~- which indeed will take you back to the most recent directory you visited but 5.: cd - is supposed to do the same thing. Trouble is, while cd ~- works flawlessly on my Debian, FC3, and NLD9 (SUSE 9.2) boxes, when I use cd - on those machines, the output is "OLDPWD not set"

    PWD stands for "print working directory". When you issue that command, the output is the directory you are currently located in. If I use "pwd" while I'm in my home directory, I get "/home/username". I did a search and while I can confirm what the command "cd -" is *supposed* to do, I cannot find out how to "set" OLDPWD so that it would actually work. :oops:
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  7. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    seems like the second option requires a variable to be set (some distros will set this), and hence doesnt technically mean it works


    for instance ll in fedora actuall runs the command ls -l --color=tty
    ll isnt however a real command :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
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  8. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    So does that mean the only correct answer really is "cd ~-"?
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+

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