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Random Linux+ Question #22

Discussion in 'Linux+' started by tripwire45, Jul 12, 2005.

  1. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    A link is a method of referencing a file from elsewhere in the file system using a different name for the file. The file still exists only once in the file system but can be located using different names. Each file is identified by an inode. The inode contains all the information about the file besides the filename.

    You want to create a link in one directory pointing to a link in a different directory. You must use the ln -s command to create this link since the command without the -s switch will only create a link in the same part of the file system. Inodes are only unique within the same file system.

    When you use ln -s, what kind of link are you creating? Choose all that apply:

    1. hard link
    2. soft link
    3. switch link
    4. symbolic link
    5. transient link

    Answer later.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  2. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    on a roll here





























    4 again
    :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCSA (messaging), ITIL Foundation v3
    WIP: Looking at doing ..................
  3. nugget
    Honorary Member

    nugget Junior toady

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    Number 5?:oops:
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP (270,271,272,290,620) | MCDST | MCTS:Vista
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  4. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Answer time. Correct answers are 2 and 4. A symbolic link is also known as a soft link. Answers 3 and 5 were totally bogus. There is such a thing as a hard link but you use the ln command with no switches to create it and it operates differently than a symbolic link.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+

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