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Question regarding job prospects in networking/ccna

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by peace786, Jul 19, 2005.

  1. peace786

    peace786 Bit Poster

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    Hi

    I am thinking of doing a ccna(cisco). I was just wondering what are the job prospects for a ccna in the uk? I have good GCSE'S/A levels and a University Diploma. I want a good job/career in IT preferably in networking. Can someome recommend or give me advice, if i were to do the ccna will there be good job prospects? or are other certifications such as msce more feasible? Also if anyone has done a ccna where can one do it in the uk at a good price? many thanks
     
  2. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    No certification on earth will get you the high paying job you want without experience. Also, keep in mind the CCNA is an entry-level cert. Not too many IT Departments will let you put your hands on their switches and routers unsupervised at that level.

    On the other hand, the CCNA can be earned in one fell swoop while the MCSE requires numerous exams and takes years to achieve. In the end, you'll have to start your educational path and start earning quals while working in an entry-level job gaining experience.

    I live in the US so I have no idea what the job market is in the UK for CCNAs versus MCSEs, but I can tell you that a certification all by itself is not likely to get you to your career goal without some experience to back it up.

    BTW, welcome to our humble forum. If you would, please take the time to pop up to the New Members Introduction forum and let us know a bit about yourself and how you found us.

    Cheers. :)
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  3. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    err trip, over here most companies (ie small - medium business) have absolutely no need of anything over a CCNA to manage a couple of vlans and routing they have going, on the larger enterprises and carriers have any need of much above that :)

    from my experiance at least.. just my 2c
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  4. peace786

    peace786 Bit Poster

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    Many thanks for your advice trip, I really appreciate it.

    Do you guys think that I should go for a ccna straight away or n +? i.e. what are the advantages/disadvantages of going straight into ccna for someone who hasnt done any other network certificate before that?

    Also presuming that I get a ccna where in the UK i.e. which field would able to offer me good network experience before I even think about applying for a more serious network job? what type of job would be feasible to gain excperience once ccna has been achieved?

    Also from where in the UK can I do a ccna at a reasonable price?

    just one last question I assume going for a mcse or ccnp after a ccna would be a good move? (assuming as trip has said I have gained some experience in the practical work under my belt?) Is networking a good IT career in the UK and does it have stabilty?

    sorry for so amny questions but I would be grateful If someone can guide me as i'm quite nervous right now as to what to do inorder to bolster my job oppurtunities in IT.

    Many thanks.
     
  5. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    If you have absolutely no network experience, you might want to study for the Network+ exam just to put a foundation under your feet.

    I think Phoenix or one of the others will have to take that one. I wouldn't have a clue.

    What do you mean "do a ccna"? Do you mean get training or take the exam?
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. The_Geek

    The_Geek Megabyte Poster

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    Speaking as someone who has started reading books for the CCNA exam, you're definately going to need some hands on experience for this exam. I always considered myself somewhat intelligent when it came to networking until I started reading these books and discovered just how dumb I am.

    Not trying to dampen your spirits, but I just want you to know that it's alot of work.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA and Micro$oft
    WIP: PDI+
  7. peace786

    peace786 Bit Poster

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    Sorry I should have been more clear. I mean from where to get CCNA training in the UK at a reasonable price?

    Thanks.
     
  8. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Peace,

    This looks good for the price. I have had lots of material off this same company. It is always of high standard.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  9. stupot

    stupot Bit Poster

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    Certifications: Cisco IT essentials I
    WIP: CCNA, N+
  10. peace786

    peace786 Bit Poster

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    Thanks guys.

    I guess it would make sense to consider the n+ too before the ccna. Would gaining an A+ also be beneficial. I know that it is a basic technical pc support qualification but will it be of benefit to do and then attempt the n+ and ccna or if I want to solely go into a network career I should concentrate on n+/ccna? I gather that the ccna runs out afer 3 years so should this be a worry?

    Also what are the majore benefits of msce as regards to a career in networking.
     
  11. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    In my opinion, learning basic PC hardware and OS maintenence is never a waste. While it might not be directly applicable to setting up Access Control Lists on a router, sooner or later, you're going to have to open up a piece of equipment and know your way around the inside of it. Also, there is a small networking component to the A+ exam (after all, you have to know how to hook the thing up to the network and what to do if it won't connect) so there's that.

    Yes, the CCNA expires after three years. A lot of certs do. Why? Because technology changes and what you learned three years ago about Cisco equipment may well be on its way out the door today and tomorrow. That means you will either have to take the CCNA exam every three years or take a more advanced exam such as the CCNP.

    Technically the MCSE doesn't expire but if your MCSE is on the NT platform, not a great deal of it will be relevant to Windows Server 2003. The whole idea behind the MCSE is the certification of a person who can manage an enterprise-wide network of Windows Domain Controllers, Servers, and Desktops along with everything else that's attached, so yes, there is a huge networking component there as well.

    No matter which direction you decide to take, you will encounter the concept of networking at some greater or lesser level since a computering device that is a total stand alone is a rare critter in the corporate world these days (tho there are exceptions).

    Hope this helps.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+

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