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Question, Please help..

Discussion in 'Network+' started by hoss6800, Apr 16, 2007.

  1. hoss6800

    hoss6800 Bit Poster

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    Hi,
    workstations 1-10 are in a network connected to each other in physical star, logical bus. If the cable connected to workstation 2 fail to work, what is going to happen?

    I am a bit confused when I come across senarios like this one. Since all my knowledge are based on readign and i haven't done any practical work on network i get confused. Is it the physical topology i have to be concentrating on or the logical links.

    I some one could explain this to me, I would be very grateful.

    Thanks
     
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  2. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    anybody???
     
  3. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    now i could be wrong here, but as i understand it, the star formation is basically all the PCs connected to a HUB/Switch/router. In this case, if the cable between the hub and workstation2 fails, the only thing that will happen is that you lose connectivity on ws2. All other machines should have no issues.

    Im sure someone else will come along soon and either corroborate me, or show me up. one or the other.
     
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  4. Tinus1959

    Tinus1959 Gigabyte Poster

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    Back in the old days you had hubs for ethernet with coaxial cable. Ethernet uses a bus structure. No matter who the physical systems are connected, the logical structure stays a logical bus.
    Think of token ring. This is a physical star (with a MAU or SMAU) but is a logical ring.
    When in a star configuration one cable is broken, only that workstation is disconnected. The rest will keep on working.
     
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  5. hoss6800

    hoss6800 Bit Poster

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    Hi,
    Thanks for your replies.
    So I just want to make sure i got this right, If any thing goes rong in this type of cases, I have to concentrate on the physical connection and just ignore the logical communication. So for our question, it doesn't matter if the logical link is bus or whatever, since physical connection is star, only WS2 is going to suffer and rest of WSs will be alright.

    Thanks angain guys
    hoss
     
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  6. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    hoss6800,

    This is a question to determine if you understand LAN technologies. Here's a short list of LAN technologies:
    1. 10Base2/10Base5
      • Logical Bus
      • Physical Bus
    2. 10BaseT
      • Logical Bus
      • Physical Star
    3. 100BaseTX
      • Logical Star
      • Physical Star

    So given your scenario, what kind of technology is involved?
     
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  7. Tinus1959

    Tinus1959 Gigabyte Poster

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    Not nessecarily. As I said, you could also have a hub and spoke configuration using 10base2.
     
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  8. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    A type of network topology in which the central nodes of one or more individual networks that are based upon the physical star topology are connected together using a common 'bus' network whose physical topology is based upon the physical linear bus topology, the endpoints of the common 'bus' being terminated with the characteristic impedance of the transmission medium where required – e.g., two or more hubs connected to a common backbone with drop cables through the port on the hub that is provided for that purpose (e.g., a properly configured 'uplink' port) would comprise the physical bus portion of the physical star-bus topology, while each of the individual hubs, combined with the individual nodes which are connected to them, would comprise the physical star portion of the physical star-bus topology.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_topology


    Is this what you are talking about?

    If so the hosts are each connected to a access switch port on a switch in a star format. The switch is then connected (sometimes called uplink or ether-channel or port-channel) to another access switch forming a star-bus. That switch then also can connect other hosts in a star.

    Lets say host A is connected to switch A. Host B is connected to switch B. Switch A and B are connected. If the link between host A and Switch A goes down. Then Host B can communicate to Switch A but not Host A.

    Now lets say that link didn't go down. But instead the link or links between Switch A and B goes down. Host A can communicate to Switch A but not to Switch B or Host B.
     
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  9. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    Yeah, I think since the question mentions that "the cable failed to work" as opposed to "link failed to work". That makes it a physical layer problem. If the question had said "the link to WC2 failed to work", then the problem could have been either physical or logical (or both).

    It's an interesting question though. How do you create a logical bus topology out of a physical star topology ? I'm thinking maybe Vlans, EtherChannel, Frame-relay ?
     
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