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PSU Fan Speed

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Jimbooo, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. Jimbooo

    Jimbooo Nibble Poster

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    So for the last few days I've been sitting and typing away on my computer having got used to the ambient sound of the fans running on my computer. So when one of the fans suddenly lowers slightly in pitch and seems to slow down a little, with a new computer, one should be worried right? I notice it right away because of getting used to the background sound..

    I need to find a program that can tell me the RPM of my PSU fan, but I can't find one anywhere. I need to know if the hardware could be failing. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions?

    The reason I know it's the PSU is because my Graphics Card has the loudest fan and I can switch that to 0% for a few minutes and still hear the lower fan noise. I doubt it's my CPU fan as I have a monitor that tells me its speed and it seems satisfactory. It's none of the case fans as I have put my finger on them to stop them moving and I can still hear the noise. That leads me to my PSU.. how can I tell the speed that the fan is running at?
     
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  2. UKDarkstar
    Honorary Member

    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    First off, you can just reboot the computer and check in the BIOS, it should tell you in there.

    Second off - check disks that came with the motherboard as there may be some proprietary software you can use.

    Thirdly, something like SiSoft Sandra should do it :

    http://www.sisoftware.co.uk/

    It may just have been settling in if it's a new pc so don't get too paranoid. Check the temperature when you're in the BIOS too, that's a better indicator

    Hope this helps
     
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  3. Jimbooo

    Jimbooo Nibble Poster

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    Also I'm a little wary about my CPU temperatures, as at idle they are around 45 degrees C on average, and under load they can go up to 55... might need to change the thermal paste as they were only at around 30 when I first installed it? I remember taking the CPU and fan out and keeping them seperate for at least a week after installing as I was waiting for my new mobo...

    Thanks Darkstar! I'll check out sisoftware, but there's no information about my PSU fan speed in the bios - only CPU fan speed.
     
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  4. UKDarkstar
    Honorary Member

    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    That temp is fine m8, it's when it starts getting to 60/70 degrees regulalrly you start to be a bit concerned. Check your BIOS settings, it will prob have a top temp setting at which it will give a warning or shut down.
     
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  5. JoshC

    JoshC Bit Poster

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    speedfan should show you the speed of the fans in your system, assuming the PSU has the little wire connected to one of the fan connectors on the motherboard

    link to speedfan --> http://www.almico.com/sfdownload.php
     
  6. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    Most PSU fans nowadays are thermally controlled. So if it's slowing down that's a good sign.
     
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  7. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    The ones that drive me absolutely crazy are the ones that spin up... and spin down... and spin up... and spin down. :blink Drives me nuts! I'd much rather it just go full blast at a constant pitch and volume, regardless of the increased noise. So... I always set my fans at a constant speed..
     
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  8. Spilly

    Spilly Kilobyte Poster

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    You can relubricate slow fans, unscrew the fan remove the sticker from the side that faced outside then remove the rubber bung with a pin. Apply 3 drops of silicon oil or sewing machine oil (or indeed any oil in desperation) and pop the bung back in. Super glue the label back on, clean off any dust from the fan blades, screw the fan back in and you are in business.

    This also works for most CPU, case, chipset, & graphic cards fans as well.

    Be careful inside your PSU though as some capicitors may remain charged even when the PSU is disconnected from the mains supply!:eek:
     
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  9. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    In case you get it on your A+ test, PSU fans are not field serviceable units. You're supposed to replace the entire PSU when they go bad. That said, some manufacturers do put them on the outside, in which case it's a fairly safe procedure.
     
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  10. Jimbooo

    Jimbooo Nibble Poster

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    But bear in mind it's a brand spanking new PSU, so if I could find there's something wrong with it then I would send it back in an instant! But I can't send it back until I know there's something definitely wrong with it because I would be charged if there was nothing wrong with it.

    There's no fan connector on the motherboard unfortunately; only 2 cables (24pin & 6 pin I think), so you think there's no way of telling it's speed?
     
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