1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Professional Advice needed

Discussion in 'Professional Associations' started by dburnejones, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. dburnejones

    dburnejones New Member

    8
    0
    1
    My company is willing to sponsor me (would have to pay back if I leave the company within 18 months of completing the course) for Professional IT courses preferably through distance learning (or they can let me have 5-7 days per year for attending training each year)

    I have looked around and not able to find many courses.

    Here is my back ground;
    • BSC equality degree in Computer Science
    • OCA certification PL/SQL
    • Over three years experience in .Net and Database development.
    • Currently working on .Net and Oracle 10g.

    I have short listed two courses and just thinking which one is best;

    -Microsoft .Net Certification (Buy Books and SelfTest Software)
    -BCS Diploma in Solution Development (through Systems Development Training Courses , they offer one BCS module through distance learning)

    Is there any distance learning course provider for .Net certification?

    Who normally marks those BCS exams papers which are done through training providers?
     
  2. LukeP

    LukeP Gigabyte Poster

    1,194
    41
    90
    Don't!.

    Self-study. Self-fund. Don't sign anything that makes you liable to pay anything back when you leave.

    My 2 cents
     
    WIP: Uhmm... not sure
    dmarsh likes this.
  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    Personally, I don't mind the "sign to say that I'll pay back if I leave with X amount of time", provided there are clauses (eg the fee is waved if I get made redundant or if I'm "let go" within that time frame). I've done it before, and if I'm given the opportunity I'll take my current employers up on it (if I'm offered). I'm in no rush to leave, I actually like the place.

    Normally, the BCS do and if it's one of those computer exams, it will self-mark based on the answer guide from the BCS (eg like Prometric), like Microsoft, Cisco, Comptia exams :)

    Personally, I wouldn't know which one to advise you to go for. As I'm not a programmer, I've had my fill (currently) of MS certs, so I'd be leaning towards the BCS diploma, but it's your choice :)
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  4. dburnejones

    dburnejones New Member

    8
    0
    1
    I think examination providers have their own papers and may be they mark them as well.

    I got this from BCS website;

    Accredited Examination Provider

    BCS accredits Examination Providers and promotes those organisations which demonstrate that they use competent staff and suitable examination papers. BCS does not accredit the course materials used by the Examination Providers who deliver the courses for the BSD scheme. If you attend a training course, details of the exam can be obtained from your Examination Provider.
     
  5. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    You have a computer science degree and an OCA certification, really a BCS diploma isn't going to mean anything.

    A few places might like to see MCPD/MCSD but again its not a strong requirement for most programming jobs. I'd recommend self study for most certs.

    I wouldn't get into debt unless something very special indeed is on offer, most of these courses aren't anything special.
    Its very hard to find good advanced level training, I've just come back from a course in the US for this very reason.

    I would take the standard annual training budget and try and carve out your own training regime. One week a year in class isn't going to cut it for certainly the beginning of your career. I think you are looking at 10-20 hours self study per week when starting out.

    There are many free and low cost options for study like books, blogs, and online videos.

    For instructor led training look around to see what is available, look at the lecture circuit, look at expert groups, look at user groups, look at summer schools or distance learning from red brick universities, look at professional training providers, etc.

    Ultimately good Experience is king and marketing yourself well.

    So also I'd look into personal projects, maybe a masters degree, or simply taking a more challenging and interesting role.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  6. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    That's a point, if they are will to pay for that (and you don't have the finances) :) 18 months is a good time period.
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  7. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    Yes, I think a good masters would cost you £7000+ so if they agreed to sponsor that it would be worth accepting the golden handcuffs for 2 years.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
    LukeP likes this.
  8. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    Job security :)
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  9. LukeP

    LukeP Gigabyte Poster

    1,194
    41
    90
    I agree with you Ken on masters. But anything less than that is just not worth it.

    I think it's reasonable to say that you can fast track your IT career at the beginning if you're working extremely hard and are a fast learner. I don't feel like I've cut any corners but I've been working/studying/working on personal projects for about 10-12 hours in total on average for last 3 years. I've progressed my career immensely in my opinion and this is nothing compared to what craigie has achieved in same 3 years. So it can be done. Locking yourself up with an employer for 18-24 months at beginning of your career seems like a safe and slow way to get somewhere. (No offense meant but somehow public sector comes to mind).

    I realise that not all areas in the UK will offer same career progression opportunities but relocating is sometimes a good way to progress not only your career but also your life (entertainment, education, fitness, social circles, networking, etc.).

    What if the OP spots a great opportunity to progress his career and the only reason for him not being able to accept it was lack of funds to pay off current employer.
     
    WIP: Uhmm... not sure

Share This Page

Loading...