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Practical stuff

Discussion in 'A+' started by feely, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. feely

    feely Bit Poster

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    Hey

    I have really just started doing the work for my A+. In my engineering course, we did a little bit of work on the inside of a PC, but nothing major ...maybe one class ...so I am wondering, would there be great value in trying to get my hands on an old PC and screw around with it...taking it apart, putting in back together, that sort of thing.

    Thanks for your time :)
     
    Certifications: HND Elect & Electronic Engineering
    WIP: A+, Network+ & BSc in Physics
  2. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Yes. Most of the A+ advice given at CF includes getting an old PC and "screwing around with it". Go for it.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  3. feely

    feely Bit Poster

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    I guess it just makes good sense...I mean, no point having no hands on experience...even if it is just on your own time, and not in an official job...so can I ask another question - what type of tools would you need, I have an idea of the basic, just just looking a kind of 'official list' if there is such a thing.

    Again, thanks :)
     
    Certifications: HND Elect & Electronic Engineering
    WIP: A+, Network+ & BSc in Physics
  4. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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  5. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    For the vast majority of the jobs I've done, I only needed a flat-head and a phillips screwdriver. There are those times when certain more specialized tools will come in handy, but you won't use them with any great frequency unless the type of work you are doing is unusual.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. feely

    feely Bit Poster

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    Cool thank you both for your help :)
     
    Certifications: HND Elect & Electronic Engineering
    WIP: A+, Network+ & BSc in Physics
  7. Fanatical

    Fanatical Byte Poster

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    I found a great alternative to buying a PC just for messing about inside is to volunteer time with an IT dept tech support team. they will probably have a few junk PC that have had a lot of their insides taken out and used in other PC's but between them all there is a lot of learning to gain. I learned tons and it really helped me with learning what different sockets and bits of kit looked like.

    If your lucky you could even be allowed to build up a base unit using old parts that no one wants and they "might" be willing to let you have it as you only built it from unwanted bits. i know that in the NHS there is a stockpile of old PC's from when the hopsital gets upgrades. We literally had a room with a bout 20 or more junked PC's with perfectly working P3's and ram and PSU's in them that the techs just didn' need to mess about with. they were happy to let me wade through all the waste bits and find out of 20 junks 1 working PC.....
     
    Certifications: A+, MCDST
    WIP: MCITP: SA
  8. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    You can buy a standard IT Tech tool kit from Maplin

    CLICK HERE

    There are a few to choose from and include tweezers as well as screwdrivers and cable cutters.

    I would also recommend cable ties for tying up wires and IDE cables inside the PC case for better air flow.

    Also a paint brush and a can of pressurised air from Aria
    Excellent for cleaning the keyboard and Motherboard.:biggrin
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  9. feely

    feely Bit Poster

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    The place I work at the minute (a non IT gig) is dumping a few PCs soon, so I think I will get my grubby little mits on some of them :)

    As for volunteering my time - I looked into that a while ago, but some places weren't interested - insurance issues they said. But its not the most practical thing at the minute, what with been in the middle of my degree and work and blah blah blah *thinks back to when I had a life* :)

    EDIT - Thanks for the maplin link :)
     
    Certifications: HND Elect & Electronic Engineering
    WIP: A+, Network+ & BSc in Physics
  10. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    As the others have mentioned, getting your hands dirty (and cut) inside a PC is easily the best way to learn.

    Remember the rule, the cheaper the PC was in the first place the quicker your hands will be in ribbons. :)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  11. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Yeah you cant beat rummaging around in a case and loosing chunks off your fingers on the sharp edges. You feel you've done a proper build when you've at least been cut once :D
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009

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