1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Please have a look at my CV

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by ibby, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    any input would be great :)

    Been looking for a new contract - Just not having any luck :(

    - No copying guys :p

    thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. shadowwebs

    shadowwebs Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    841
    10
    76
    I think it's a good CV personally
     
    Certifications: compTIA A+, Apple Certified Technical Coordinator 10.10 (OS X Yosemite, Server and Support)
  3. ade1982

    ade1982 Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    566
    12
    52
    Yeah, it's pretty good. Might just be a case of waiting it out.
     
  4. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    any recommendations or improvements guys ?
     
  5. shadowwebs

    shadowwebs Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    841
    10
    76
    I like the layout and its concise enough to read so that's both good ticks
     
    Certifications: compTIA A+, Apple Certified Technical Coordinator 10.10 (OS X Yosemite, Server and Support)
  6. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    being applying for jobs,
    want a onsite role, but no-one has had a sniff!
    :(

    I know me not having certs is letting me down!

    Maybe I should wait!
     
  7. shadowwebs

    shadowwebs Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    841
    10
    76
    You are currently employed though aren't you? ... so it might be worth trying to sit some certifications to booster your CV, but a lot of the time it is the experience with the cert that holds you ahead of other candidates rather than just the cert alone.
     
    Certifications: compTIA A+, Apple Certified Technical Coordinator 10.10 (OS X Yosemite, Server and Support)
  8. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    Yep, currently working.

    Its due to come to a end in a month or so, just been checking the waters. I have already decided to do server 2008 MCSA
     
  9. shadowwebs

    shadowwebs Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    841
    10
    76
    I know I have already looked at your CV, but what kind of IT work do you want to get in to, is it Server or Hardware, and if you say Hardware then is it builds or desktop support
     
    Certifications: compTIA A+, Apple Certified Technical Coordinator 10.10 (OS X Yosemite, Server and Support)
  10. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    I want to be a remote engineer or Server Support. (like I used to be).

    I have done my share of first and second line roles.

    Any one recruiting?
     
  11. Nyx

    Nyx Byte Poster

    131
    7
    15
    Your current post takes most space on your CV, but isn't actually the most technical - if you want to work beyond 1st/2nd line your CV must convince readers that you do have the skills needed. In description you wrote "Working to agreed Service Level Agreements" and "making sure cases were dealt within SLA" - waste of space in my opinion. Also is it really important that you have finished high school 15 years ago?
    What have you been doing at Dixons? No need to elaborate but it does not look well.

    Just my 2p;)
     
  12. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    I actually cut a lot of the experience out because my cv would have ended up on 3 pages!
    (especially from my remote engineer role)

    @ Dixon's I worked on different roles, 2 in particular But I am out of space!
     
  13. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    You should definitely list that you have the MCSA as you will be missing recruiter searches by leaving it off.

    CV looks ok, could do with page break at 'Dec 2005 -' to align sections to page boundaries.

    I'd drop the references section, it adds nothing, everyone knows they can ask you for references.

    Education looks ok to me, except I'd maybe separate courses from qualifications under your certifications. You could summarize as A+, N+, MCSA.

    Third person / impersonal reads a bit weird for a personal profile section to me, I'd write this section in the first person.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  14. RichyV

    RichyV Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    536
    17
    79
    I have to agree there...
     
    Certifications: B.Sc.(Hons), MBCS. MCP (271,272), MCDST, MCTS (680), MCITP:EDST7, MCSA:WIN7, MCPS, MCNPS
    WIP: 70-686, then onto MCSE: Desktop Infrastructure via MCSA: Server 2012...
  15. ibby

    ibby Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    The issue is I have been on the courses but not got the certs :( Hence why I just listed them


     
  16. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,189
    296
    319
    Would drop the courses - anyone can do them. The certs mean something.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  17. AdamV

    AdamV Bit Poster

    26
    4
    19
    I was going to suggest you should at least separate out exams and courses to make it clearer - if you passed 70-290 then say so. And say what certs you do have (if any) even if that is only an MCP and MCTS, these all help those search engines.

    If you have not taken the exams then I would say it is misleading to use the exam numbers at all, use the course numbers instead. (hint - anything that starts with 70- is an exam, courses will be 4 or 5 digits, sometimes with a revision letter eg A, B after them, although often not quoted).

    If you don't have any of the exams, then I would include the courses as otherwise it looks very thin. Or why not take advantage of the second shot offer and go take one or more exams while getting a chance to take it again for free if you don't pass first time?

    I agree with others that bullets about basic essentials like meeting SLAs should be de-prioritised or deleted, otherwise you might as well add "turning up to work on time" and so on.
    For each role it can help to have an opening sentence describing roughly what the job involved, then bullet the details. You should also look at trying to say what effect you doing the job had - did it save the company time, money, allow them to do something they could not before? Maybe also make it clear how you did the job - via phone, remote logon, face to face, travelling to other sites / offices. Depending on the job you are going for they might need these skills. If you have only done support by phone and I need someone to go out and provide face to face support for my customers, I'm going to choose someone that has that on their CV (more likely) - and vice versa.

    I think you need to say lots more about your previous role where you were going out to do work for people - were these people paying you directly? That says a lot about the level of quality work and customer service you have to provide compared to someone buried in a huge helpdesk of a corporate organisation who can more easily hide their mistakes and not deal with the difficult problems or people. There is some merit in showing the skills this gives you in business terms as well, as many firms look for IT staff who can be more 'holistic' in providing support appropriate to the business needs, with an eye to good prioritisation of resources (including technical, people, money, and time, not necessarily in that order).

    I think your "high school" qualifications are not as important as your tech stuff, but valid to put on there, especially in the current climate with rising percentages of pupils leaving school without basics such as English and Maths GCSEs. Not going to set anyone alight, but at least puts a tick in a vital box.

    There's probably room for some detail of the technologies you have worked with, and don't be afraid to name names and versions, especially around things like windows server versions, virtualisation, and security products.
    Emphasise "corporate" level software and skills over "home" ones (if that is the market you are aiming at) - for example deploying, configuring, monitoring and updating antivirus using a centralised enterprise-level tool (which most AV vendors provide) is way different than downloading and installing a free bit of software and just accepting the default install and setting it to auto-update every 24 hours.

    (I'm not saying a free AV tool would do any worse a job, in fact the reverse often seems to be the case, the point here is simply about skills on a CV)
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
    Certifications: MCT, MCSA:Messaging 2003, MCTS:Dynamics CRM 4.0 and 2011; MOS: Master Instructor 2003, 2007
    WIP: Writing CRM 2013 Customization course. Planning to take all CRM 2013 exams ASAP

Share This Page

Loading...