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please could you take a moment to read my question.

Discussion in 'A+' started by alih786, Apr 29, 2008.

  1. alih786

    alih786 Nibble Poster

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    i am currently studying the COMPTIA A+ CERTIFICATION exam, soon 2 take final exam in about 2-3weeks time. anyway i have heard that the course SCJP (SUN CERTIFIED JAVA PROGRAMMER) is a good subject and study on, i am thinking of doing that after i passed my a+. i was wanting to become a technician by looking at the IT JOBS WATCH website, it seems i cant get anything OVER 40k. now im thinking of doing a programming course, why? because the main reason is so that i earn big money. the ONLY reason why i am taking the a+ course is to learn computers myself and to earn big serious money (which i thought would be). i have seen on websites i cant get anything over at least 40k on a+ courses, but programming? should i do that? if so, what should i start with?? is it hard? easy?
    i must make a living for myself and my mother, and make a living for the future, i promised God, my mum and myself i would bring wealth into our lives and live a good life,and i must and will(if God wills:( ) for that to happen, we need money to live, survive and for wealth. should i do the programming course???? if so, where can i take it? how do i revise for it and where do i do the exams??

    ps. just 2 let you know, i will be taking more technician courses aswell (ccna, mcdst and lastly MCSE. - those three im gonna do from this september and complete in 2 yrs.).
     
    Certifications: BTEC First Diploma - Cisco IT Essentials
  2. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    You seem to have all this arse backwards mate.

    Firstly, whilst you can earn 40k+, you wont be earning that from the outset. Wipe that thought right out of your mind. A whopping salary like that comes with experience, and bags of it. It also has bags of responsibility associated with it. Certifications dont earn you anything. They just demonstrate that you have the requisite knowledge and experience.

    I'll tell you now, I'm a programmer, with 1 year full time programming experience, and a year or so part time programming experience. I'm just about to earn 25k. With your A+, you're likely going to be walking into a job at around 12-14k. You might get lucky and get higher, but its unlikely.

    Secondly, the cert path you have indicated isnt really logical. after your A+, MCDST is a logical next step. CCNA is above A+ and MCDST (as best I can tell).

    I'm not even going to comment on the fact that the only reason you seem to want to work in IT is for the 'bags of money'.

    I would suggest you spend a lot, and i mean a lot, more time researching the certifications, and where you want to go in your career.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
    WIP: None at present
  3. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    ...and none of those technical certifications (A+, CCNA, MCDST) are related to being a programmer, nor is the MCSE. Programming and IT administration are two wholly different fields. One will not likely help you much, if at all, with the other.

    Fergal's right on target with his advice.

    If you're trying to get into IT simply because of the monetary aspect... you won't likely make it very far. IT is by and large an enthusiasts field, where the people who do well are the people who truly enjoy it - those who eat, breathe, and dream about computers. Obviously, there are exceptions... but those who enjoy what they are doing typically excel and get the jobs over those who do the job solely for the money.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  4. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Somebody wants to get into IT for the money? Thought those days were over.... :blink
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  5. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    You couldn't be more wrong in my experience, being a good programmer is a 24/7 job, even if you enter the profession passionate about it its hard going. Learning to be a good programmer typically takes 3-6 years, not a minimal investment of ones life. Learning is constant and does not stop. Despite being the most knowledgeable you are also often at the bottom of the pecking order.

    These blogs say alot of what life as a programmer can be about :-

    http://www.michaelnygard.com/blog/2002/03/lately_i_have_been_struggling.html

    http://www.michaelnygard.com/blog/2002/04/we_who_build_worlds_dwell.html

    http://angryaussie.wordpress.com/2008/04/21/project-management-disasters/

    I don't know why you think programmers make easy money, people in other professions make far more money for far less effort in my experience.

    If you do decide to take the programming route because you have a real passion then the SCJP is an excellent certification and not to be underestimated.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  6. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Back in the 90s there was good money in IT that ended years ago for your first IT job you would be lucky to earn over 14k.

    If your going into IT just for the money you are going to struggle, most people who do well in IT (i.e earn good money) do it because they enjoy it not because of the money.

    Entry level cert are as follows A, N+ and MCDST nothing else should be considered if you are wanting a job as a tech. As for programming maybe look into a course that teaches C++.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  7. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    It's hard!
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Um - it took me the best part of 20 years to get to £40k as a programmer.

    Don't expect to get anywhere near that in under 10 years at least, assuming you are very talented.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  9. Markyboyt

    Markyboyt Kilobyte Poster

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    Wow, im gobsmacked lol
    I think expecting 2 £111 exams to be the key to a straight £40k+ is maybe a little bit over enthusiatic, have you been talking to any advertised training providers by any chance?

    Im currently studying A+ with the intention of getting a career in IT, i dont eat, sleep and breathe computers but i do have a strong interest in them and how they work and it really bugs me when they dont work that i have to fix them (even if its not mine :lol: ) definately more so than cars, a job in IT and a nice pay check would be superb but reality unfortunately kicks in and tells me that a job in IT is the first step.

    Currently i earn 18.5k and manage to spend it all doing nothing so a drop to 12-14k would kill me but thats the nature of the beast. I appreciate that you seem to have a lot of financial needs and i think you maybe need to have a rethink on the path to solving them.

    Also as nobody else has stated in black and white, with no experience i would be careful arming yourself with some of the more advanced certificates otherwise you will risk overqualification which could go against you.
     
    WIP: A+
  10. alih786

    alih786 Nibble Poster

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    u sed: 'I appreciate that you seem to have a lot of financial needs' and yes ur right im not in financial needs, but will be if i dont make an earning for myself. and also, im not just studying the A+ for the money, im doing it because i also am interested in IT, and to be honest its the ONLY thing im good at. back when i did my GCSE's i failed,but when i learned about the A+ course - that catched me. it was something that i knew that i would be good at, and the only thing that just might make a good, decent, wealthy living for myself.
     
    Certifications: BTEC First Diploma - Cisco IT Essentials
  11. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    You're not listening, are you? :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  12. Suttar

    Suttar Byte Poster

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    With a mixed bag of certs and no experience, you'll get nowhere fast. Especially since it sounds like your not interested in working your way up the ladder. you just want big bucks and now!
     
    Certifications: Hnc Comp & Bsc Networking, ITIL v3
    WIP: CCNA
  13. alih786

    alih786 Nibble Poster

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    yes alright people, your right, i shud just concentrate on what im good at and stick with that and build my way up the ladder. for a good life.
     
    Certifications: BTEC First Diploma - Cisco IT Essentials
  14. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yes, yes you should. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  15. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    I’m not sure how you’re taking the advice given here. Nobody has ripped you, and there was plenty said in the OP that could have been.

    Yes, there is money in IT, as there are in many professions. However, the competition & marketers know this too. The ones in it for money are likely to flip/flop jobs and careers chasing the next big profession (i.e remember Day Traders?). The reason people (me included) have succeeded in IT is because we truly love ('enjoy’ for some) what we do, we want to learn and experience more, the money comes after. Once everything is equal, then money becomes a factor in our decision process to which job take.
     
  16. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    If you really want to make money in IT ... then setup a private training company and hoodwink people into paying thouands of pounds on the promise that they will earn big bucks after getting a qualification and with no actual experience. :)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  17. Peggsta

    Peggsta Bit Poster

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    Very big LOL.

    Sorry to all but I just couldn't help but be totally astounded/gobsmacked/ etc by the origonal post and what followed!!!!

    Now I know for damn sure (not that I wasn't so sure) I know what I'm working to, to get into in a career in IT, unlike someone here!!
    :ohmy:blink
     
    Certifications: None yet
    WIP: A+ N+ CCNA
  18. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Ok, let's settle down. This is just a case of a fellow trying to make heads or tails of how developing a career in IT works and trying to dispel a myth or two. Nothing more to see here. Move along...move along.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  19. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I would say the administrative end of things is just as hard and takes just as long. It takes a long time to learn the different systems/servers in use, to learn to automate your tasks with a couple of portable scripting languages, and become at least halfway competent in security and networking.

    Programming takes a deeper level of understanding than system administration in how programs work and how they are assembled, but to be a good system administrator means a deep understanding of a broad range of concepts. To be good in either area takes a long time and a lot of concerted, on-going effort to stay current with your knowledge. The learning is never over no matter which area a person chooses.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  20. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Freddy I see your point, but what is the rate of failure for infrastructure projects ? How difficult is it to set up a DB versus writing a database engine from the ground up? How much has database admin and networking changed over last 5-10 years ? How many infrastructure projects are destined to fail because too many people involved have major misconceptions about the technology ? How many infrastructure projects run for 2+ years, cost millions and never get released? How many turn into deathmarches ? How many new methodologies/ideologies do you have to learn every other year ?


    I think its possible to excel or get by in both professions but in general i'd guess admin/infrastructure is easier, just my opinion, and i'm biased :wink:
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH

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