1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Planning to do A+

Discussion in 'A+' started by vivek_master146, Nov 27, 2008.

  1. vivek_master146

    vivek_master146 Bit Poster

    29
    0
    7
    Hi Friends,
    This is my first post in this forum. My name is Vivek. I am from delhi,India. I am doing a degree in Computer Applications(BCA). I am operating PC with Window OS since 6 years and i am always hungry to gain more and more knowledge of computers. I have learn C,C++,VB programming and SEO,Flash through self-study.

    I have seen the syllabus of COMPTIA A+ and found it really good. I am mainly interested in application programming but i also want to learn some basics of hardware like assembling PC, installing hardware components like Gfx card, Ram, HD etc. I am also interested to know Window XP in depth.

    Does COMPTIA Essentials teach basics of hardware(practical and theoretical both) ?

    and what is the other exam i should opt for?

    Would 602 be fine as it is well balanced?

    I contacted a prometric center and they are charging around Rs 9000(US $ 200 including VAT) for A+ Training.(excluding exam)

    I always do self-study but as it involves hardware i want to go for training. They are providing 60 hours training.

    Please advise that should i go for these test centers for training or look for some reputed IT institutes?
     
  2. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    The A+ teaches both hardware and operating systems. Most people do the 602 after the mandatory essentials exam. Although you can do them in any order you want.

    If you self study normally then just carry on, get your self an old pc to practice taking to pieces etc and read up on the study guides.

    The best books to get are compTIA A+ all in one exam guide by Mike Meyers and PC Technician street smarts by James Pyles.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  3. vivek_master146

    vivek_master146 Bit Poster

    29
    0
    7
    Thanks for reply.

    The price of A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, Sixth Edition in Amazon is US $ 37.

    I hope i can easily get this book in Delhi books market.

    Is 603 and 604 OS and Hardware oriented respectively?

    Please tell me the main difference in the syllabus of 602,603,604?
     
  4. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    The 602 is Called the IT Technican exam so it covers hard ware and software.

    THe 603 is helpdesk technician so it covers helpdesk issues mainly software (operating systems) related.

    The 604 is depot technician which covers software and hardware also.

    The 602 would be your best bet.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  5. Unemployed Diogenes

    Unemployed Diogenes Nibble Poster

    84
    0
    33
    A+ gonne help you for sure to get the basics of PC hardware en troubleshooting. I'm half in the book now, i knew a lot before. But now i understand much more in depth from Hardware.
    The OS stuff is pretty basic for me, but also interesting to read.
     
    Certifications: A+, Bachelor IT
    WIP: CCNA
  6. vivek_master146

    vivek_master146 Bit Poster

    29
    0
    7
    In Uk does IT Companies hire technicians just on the basis of COMPTIA cert.?

    In India, employers prefer Degree in Computer Science?

    Its difficult to get job of network engineer after doing N+. CCNA is much advanced and preferred though its more Cisco oriented but it also teaches basic concepts.
     
  7. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    The A+ is geared towards entry level or trainee/junior techs which is what you should be aiming for, the same goes for the N+.

    The CCNA is an advanced cert and geared towards people who already are working and are working with CISCO switches etc it's isn't for someone looking for their first job.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  8. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

    13,493
    179
    287
    Just to modify the info a bit, the CCNA is advanced relative to the A+ but is considered "entry-level" relative to Cisco certifications. As GBL states though, the A+ and the CCNA are *not* on the same level at all. Also, the A+ is vendor neutral, at least in theory, so it reflects the technician's ability to work on a variety of hardware and software platforms. The CCNA by definition, relates only to Cisco products (and believe me, there are other internetworking hardware and software platforms available in the world).
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  9. vivek_master146

    vivek_master146 Bit Poster

    29
    0
    7
    I really liked this forum but in this forum more discussion is done on hardware and networking certifications?

    What about software engineers ? :(

    I already told that i am interested mainly in application programming along with some OS skills(Maybe i will later pursue MCDST).

    How is Java's SCJP and Microsoft certifications like MCTS,MCPD and MCSD ?

    I have heard that in Microsoft's .net certifications VB and VB.NET is not there. There is only C# and ASP.NET.

    I started my programming with Visual basic and learned it on my own with the help of VB 6 BLACK BOOK by Steve Holzner.
     
  10. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    I am principally a software engineer. My experience over the years is that companies aren't very interested in certs, and are more focussed on experience.

    My department has a policy of using Java where possible, but I'm not aware of *anyone* who has SCJP for example. Many of us (myself included) have records of attendance at training courses, but these seem to be viewed as an unimportant extra to the training itself.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  11. vivek_master146

    vivek_master146 Bit Poster

    29
    0
    7
    @Hbromhall

    Experience only comes when a person gets a job and works in that company. Every ITian is a fresher once in their life.

    Does software engineers do these COMPTIA and Cisco courses?


    In India Software Engineers basically just do their degree(MCA) and only few of them go for SCJP and some Microsoft certification. Yes they do some courses from reputed institutes. Those institutes have their own programme.
     
  12. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    True. But you have studied quite a few languages, so you must have written *something* in those languages (even if it was just "Hello world"!). You should be able to use that experience to get your first (trainee) programming job.
    Usually - no. But there is nothing stopping you from gaining those certs. Employers won't be interested in them though (as mine isn't).

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  13. vivek_master146

    vivek_master146 Bit Poster

    29
    0
    7
    Does prometric and Pearson Vue gives good training on COMPTIA A+?
     
  14. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    Those two companies tend to be thought of as testing companies, not training. They *may* offer training, but I'm not aware of it if they do.

    I just used them to take my certs - but I used self-study for those certs.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  15. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

    1,422
    21
    80
    A lot of employers hire Maths and physics grades to train when it comes to software development, as they have great analyst skills. Of course computer science is also a great way to get in the industry.

    Visual basic isn't really highly regarded in the industry (mickey mouse), in fact i have seen lecturers roll around laughing at its mention.

    C+ is a great language to learn generally

    However, learning fundamentals and software development is more important so you can turn to any language.

    If you take the degree route don't be disheartened if you start off with languages you never heard of modula2, pascal, eiffel, Miranda these are great languages for training various disciplines eiffel for example used to be great to teach principles of OO and Miranda for functional.

    With computer science of course you also get to lean about hardware and often the cross over into assembly.

    Regarding Comptia etc with software development its not a requirement but useful, one would expect a racing car driver to know a bit about engines.
     
    Certifications: Loads
    WIP: Lots
  16. MrNerdy

    MrNerdy Megabyte Poster

    544
    4
    0
    CCNA is often taken as part of a Degree in Computing.
    And that is why in some countries it is seen as the qualification to have even for entry level IT Techie posts.
    A+ is a basic techie qualification & N+ is still sought after exam.
    Perhaps by taking A+ & N+ it would help you to progress to CCNA.
     
    Certifications: ECDL, CiscoIT1 & A+
    WIP: Girlfriend & Network+
  17. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

    1,219
    58
    116
    Prometric and Pearson Vue are just test providers, typically they will be located inside training centres or university/colleges, so they themselves dont provide the training.

    It sounds to me realistically that buying the books and doing some study and practical work may be the only thing needed here, as with a programming career, these certifications will not help your career, so you maybe best saving the money on the exams and buying some programming books instead.

    Best of luck.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal

Share This Page

Loading...