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Ping Trip

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by ffreeloader, Aug 16, 2006.

  1. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Trip,

    Wasn't it you that was wondering about NFS a while back? I found some documentation that's pretty good if you're interested. I set up NFS today and it's pretty slick. It's pretty easy to do some basic sharing too, if you don't follow the directions for the hosts.allow and hosts.deny files found on almost all the tutorials on the net. Methinks most of these people have just copied from one another as the way they say to set up those files simply will not work.

    I'll write up a short HOWTo for basic file sharing usage of NFS on Debian if anyone's interested.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I may have missed the point, but I'm fairly sure that the hosts.allow/hosts.deny system is now deprecated in favour of all the entries being in 'allow'.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Harry,

    As far as I know, from reading the examples and the current Debian README files and NFS HOWto on sourceforge, both files are still used. I found nothing that references everything being in the hosts.allow file.

    What I did find was that using host names, rather than host IP addresses, simply will not work. I spent almost the entire time it took me to get NFS up and running figuring that out because I had missed 2 lines in the sourceforge HOWTo. All the other examples I found on the net used host names. The sourceforge HOWTo had a two line paragraph saying DO NOT use host names in the .allow and .deny files because it causes a loop with portmap and dns.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  4. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Ah - this may be a FreeBSD'ism then.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  5. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    It is possible, but it's also possible that I simply missed the documentation on the newest release. The sourceforge HOWTo was written in May of this year so it's possible that there are have been changes made since then that were not reflected in the HOWTo.

    I didn't read all the documentation on sourceforge so you can still be correct as even when something has been deprecated it will still work the old way for a while.

    In the *BSD's does NFS now deny access by default, and only allow access to what is entered in hosts.allow? In Debian it still allows all connections by default.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Er - sorry - don't know. I've never actualy had to use NFS in anger. It was just that the hosts.* files rang a bell as I've had to change them for other reasons.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    OK. Just wondered. I really can't believe how easy it is to set up basic NFS file sharing. I shared my home directory off my workstation with all the other Linux machines in my lab and they mount it transparently at boot. Once you've done this a time or two it takes less than a 1/2 hour to set it up from installation of the nfs kernel server to installing the clients and making all the shares. I was pretty surprised at how easy it is as I had heard that it was a real pain to set up. It isn't.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1

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