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Peer to Peer

Discussion in 'Network+' started by Boycie, May 24, 2005.

  1. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    "if you have more than 10 workstations in a peer to peer you can expect problems". This is the general vibe but what can you expect if you exceed this limit?

    Boyce
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  2. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Pretty much yes, as you would have to physically administer each machine, in terms of all having the same user accounts, access rights, etc. If you wanted each user to be able to logon to any machine, it's more effort than is practical. Also, imagine if you wanted to standardise the software, etc each PC/user had access to - you would have to do it on a "per-machine" basis. Hence setting up a domain offers centralised administration and security, as well as much much more.
     
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  3. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Gav,

    So apart from the admin side the network would'nt start playing up in any way shape or form?

    Boyce
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  4. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    You might expect to start to see slowdown, and packet collisions, depending on how all were connected. Basically, I wouldn't look at it as a reliable solution.
     
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  5. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Depends on whether you are using a hub or a switch. The more workstations you add to a hub, the more network collisions you can expect since all the computers will be in the same collision domain. If you are using a switch (since it's a more intellegent device), the switch segments each connection point-to-point so the collision domain is limited to whichever two workstations are communicating at any given time. Here's a couple of (hopefully) helpful links:

    http://support.intel.com/support/express/hubs/sb/cs-012063.htm

    http://www.linktionary.com/s/switching.html
     
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  6. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Thanks guys. The Myers book didn't mention these explanations :(
    Just starting the David Groth one today :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  7. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    Peer to peer networks dont use hubs/switches as far as I recall they were all daisy chained together using T Connectors and vampire taps with a resistor at each end (50 ohm i believe)
    this was the realm of Thinnet and Thicknet networks (10Base2 and 10Base5)
    10BaseT was the first UTP star topology deployment as far as I recall

    I could be missing the question though

    See the following
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10base2
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10BASE5
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_network
     
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  8. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Technically, you are correct Ryan however, I think the term has taken a broader meaning, differentiating peer networks from server/client networks. jmho. :oops:
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+

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