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Pascal Compilers

Discussion in 'Scripting & Programming' started by flex22, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Which Pascal compiler would you recommend for someone wanting to learn Pascal.

    There's some free compilers out there, but I don't mind paying a little if it's the one to get.

    Not sure whether to go with the turbo version.I'm thinking that this is backward compatible anyway, and with the added features, might be the best one to go for.

    I'd be able to learn all the basics, plus have the advantages of extra features.

    Just not sure really, so advise please :!:
     
  2. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    Not really sure to be honest flex. I haven't touched Pascal for years and then the only version I played with was in Delphi, the Borland alternative to Visual Basic. Out of curiosity, why learn Pascal ?
     
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  3. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Well it's a good language to know, in itself, and as a forerunenr to learning Java.

    I dabble in learning programming.I'm into Java at present, but thought I would go back and learn Pascal.Seeing the progression through the languages brings understanding in terms of how things are changing and why they are changing.Pascal is just a ncie starter language I think.
    Where I could well skip over it, I want to learn it, it doesen't look difficult to learn.

    Although I'm studying Windows 2000, I have to admit, I find programming far more interesting, personally.

    But getting a job as one is very difficult with just learning it as a hobby.

    However I believe that I am really well suited to programming, just really interests me.I learn it and read about it for hours, and it never seems like a chore.

    My plan is to carry on with Windows 2000, possibly get a couple of MCP's, who knows maybe MCSE (though don't think that's going to happen).

    Then get a job somewhere as a helpdesk or whatever, then if the same company has programmers then I could go for a progarmmers job internally, if I show them some of my programs I've created.

    Anyway that's my little masterplan.

    I'm not giving Windows 2000 up, I'll carry on and get some MCP's maybe, but it seems pointless saying I'm going to stick with it forever, ebcause I feel more and more that it's not really for me.

    Anyway now I told you that, you'll know if I ever ask programming questions now and then.

    Thanks :!:
     
  4. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    It seems like a good plan flex. I was just curious because you very rarely see Pascal mentioned these days, it's all Java, .net, PHP, C etc etc. Perhaps learning Pascal will help nail down the fundamentals which don't seem to change whatever language you're using.
     
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  5. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yeah exactly.

    Other's might not bother, but then again 50% of designs end up failing, hmmm :!:
    Anyway I do it my way, so this is the way I wanna do it :D

    I plan on learning different languages.At the moment it's Java, as a mate gave me some Java material, plus there's loads of stuff on the net, and the SDK comes free.

    Once I am feel ready, I'll have a gander at another one.

    Not sure exactly where I'm heading with this, but who knows.
    Glad you think my plan is good.Seems the best way to me, considering my situation.

    Thanks :!:
     
  6. nugget
    Honorary Member

    nugget Junior toady

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    Flex, if you want to learn programming then Pascal is the right one to start learning with. We were taught Pascal as the first language in University as it lends itself very well to learning basic theories, form and structure.

    Personally I found that Borland Turbo Pascal 7 was the best for me (at the time) but as my teacher was fond of telling us 'keep things as standard as possible' which is why we had to use the non turbo versions.
     
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  7. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yeah, seems like keeping it simple is the way to go at the start.Thanks for the advice on that nugget.
    I'll get the free version off the net, then I can always upgrade to turbo.
    :afro
    Thanks a lot all :!:
     

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