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Over Clocking question

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by greenbrucelee, Mar 22, 2008.

  1. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    My Bios has lots of options like auto overclock etc you just tell it how much by eg. 5% 10% 15% or 20% and the settings are adjusted automatically.

    Does this carry the same risks as manually overclocking or is it safer?
     
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  2. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Overclocking is overclocking is overclocking.

    The components are supplied at a rated level, which they have been tested to be stable at. Some may be able to perform at a higher level (since manufacturers tend to rate in set steps rather than incrementally), but theres no guarantee. No matter whether you adjust it manually or your bios uses predefined settings, you are still pushing the component above the rated settings.

    You take any and all related risks when doing so - and most manu's state that overclocking instantly voids the warranty.

    Its entirely up to you whether to do it or not, but your bios doing it for you negates none of the risk.
     
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  3. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Thats what I thought, when I build a new system I may experiment with the one I have now and see if overclocking it by 20% works.
     
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  4. neutralhills

    neutralhills Kilobyte Poster

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    Don't do it on any system where you can't afford to lose data. Windows doesn't handle spontaneous reboots all that gracefully.
     
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  5. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    As far as I am aware, using the pre-set overclock percentages doesn't change anything other than the FSB by the required amount. Some people I know have stuck it on 10% and been happy with that. Most systems will take that % quite happily and won't require any other modifications (voltage tweaks etc..). I wouldn't advise going for 20% right away, it's much better to gradually push the figures up and check for stability each time.

    To answer your final question, it's no different than overclocking it the manual way, it's just a little easier. The risks (all be it, very small ones) are just the same. Something like the AI NOS setting is different and is a way of giving you system variable levels of overclocking boost.
     
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  6. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    If you buy good components there is minimal risk of damage from overclocking, because of failsafe measures. I've taken my system to its limits within reason, and when I push it too much it simply restarts at default settings.
     
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  7. greenbrucelee
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    My mobo is an Asus p5NE-sli I used the auto overclock before and increased my 2.1GHz cpu to 2.55GHz it booted normally no problems but I got a bit worried and returned it to its original speed.
     
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  8. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I haven't overclocked in a while actually. In the past I've done manual overclock because I can get better results, customize the settings the way I want, etc. Either way it puts stress on the components. If you want to play around with overclocking I would suggest that you get good parts such as good motherboard, ram and cpu.
     
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  9. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    If it remains stable and cool there's nothing to worry about. I've taken my 3.2Ghz Pentium 4 to 3.4GHz stable and left it there.

    No problems at all. :)
     
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  10. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Why does my memory timings show 5-5-5-18 when they are supposed to be 4-4-4-12 and is ok to put it to 4-4-4-12?
     
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  11. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    Your system has probably determined those to be stable timings. It's no big deal to the point where you would see a difference in performance.
     
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  12. greenbrucelee
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    Right I understand cheers mate.:D
     
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  13. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    No problems, dude! :biggrin

    When timings are quoted by a manufacturer they seem to be always the fastest under 'optimal conditions', and many of the users simply don't have those.
     
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  14. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Hope you've got some spare cash sitting around in case you fry one or more components. That'd set your IT career back a tad, considering.

    The question I'd ask myself is this: is it *really* worth the increase in speed?
     
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  15. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Its probably better just to buy better and faster components.
     
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  16. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yup, only overclock if you really need to and also if you have the cash to replace the parts. If you have the cash then you might as well just upgrade the PC. :biggrin
     
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  17. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    Remember though, that it is possible that if even faster components are purchased they could still be underclocked to the rate that you're currently getting. I've had several experiences of this. If you are getting getting the currently fast hardware being underclocked, then I fail to see how getting faster components will make a difference, as your system's limits have already been defined.

    But it's up to you. :)
     
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  18. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    The "Black Edition" CPUs from AMD have unlocked multipliers. My stock 4400+ X2 runs like a 5000+ with just a little FSB boost though. ;)
     
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