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Onto my Forth Interview

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Queeg, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. Queeg

    Queeg Bit Poster

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    Hi, I'm kind of new here and I was hoping for some tips on my next interview (have read the interview sticky too). I've had three interviews for IT jobs already (all entry level), one was a telephone interview. I feel they have gotten better each time (starting to get confident despite not hearing back). The recruiter that has set me up said she thought that I'd be a very strong candidate for the job :), hope shes right.

    The title is Junior IT Technician, so I'd be maintaining and installing new systems etc. I was hoping you guys might have had interviews for positions like this and you might know what kind of questions they will ask. Also I was wondering if I should avoid talking about IT experience (as I have no commerical experience), because I read in another thread that mentioning helping friends and neighbours with computers is a bad thing?

    I was hoping to land a place at Fujitsu, however, since I hold out little hope of that I really do want this job (as it sounds like something I would enjoy, whereas I wanted to work at Fujitsu because it's a good company, not because of the positions available). I know I must sound very picky for someone looking for his first IT job, but I want to work somewhere I can stay for a long time and move up in the company. Anyway, hope you experienced IT folks can help me.

    Thanks in advance
     
    Certifications: MCTS, MCDST, A+, Network+
  2. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Could be anything. They might ask you things that are specific to what you would be doing... and since we don't work there, that could involve just about anything. It's not really something you can study up on... you either already know it, or you don't. If you're the best fit for the position (a better fit than any of your competition), then you'll likely be hired. If not, you won't... and you'll just have to keep looking.

    Don't give up - getting your first IT job is likely the hardest thing you'll do in IT. You'll get your chance. :)

    You won't likely be able to avoid it. First, they've already seen your CV, so they know how much/little IT experience you have. Second, they'll likely want to talk about what sort of things you've done.

    Look at it this way: working on friends' and neighbors' PCs isn't as good as real-world IT experience... but working on friends' and neighbors' PCs is MUCH better than not having any experience at all.

    Just because you get in with a large company doesn't mean you're destined to advance with that company. I've heard plenty of horror stories where a manager did NOT want to let someone smart advance because they were so GOOD at the position, and if they left, only the "less skilled" people would remain. Not saying that WILL happen to you... just want you to realize that you might advance in ANY company... and you might not.

    It's OK to be a little picky... just don't pass up a potential job because it doesn't have ALL the things you're looking for in a company. Again, getting your first IT job is difficult enough - don't make it more difficult than it already is by NOT applying for certain jobs. :)

    Good luck in the interview!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  3. Queeg

    Queeg Bit Poster

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    Thanks mate, If they do offer my the job in the interview I will no doubt take it. I'm not employed at the moment so I really want a job (and so far this has been the best job I've found whilst applying). I saw a thread when someone said they like it when applicants phone in to ask if their application has been recieved, as it shows they are interested. So I phoned them last thursday to try and confirm the interview, which may have been a bad move (the recruiter lectured me that I wasn't supposed to do that!). Also I turn 19 on friday, so If I'm still unemployed by then it shall be a little depressing :blink.

    One more thing though, what do you think is the best thing to say when they ask what salary you're looking for. They are offering 16-20K which I think it's extremely generous. So should I just say "Well Laura (the recruitment lady) told me you were offering 16-20 and I thought that was spot on the salary range that I'm looking for?

    Thanks for your help Mike.
     
    Certifications: MCTS, MCDST, A+, Network+
  4. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Most companies won't hire on the first interview... most of the time, they'll have things to discuss and other candidates to interview. However, if they're absolutely convinced that you are better than the competition, they might offer you a job on the spot.

    Meh, I don't think you've done any harm by calling. :)

    Don't kick yourself if you aren't employed by age 19... getting your first IT job is the hardest thing you'll ever do. Wait... I already said that! :D

    It's entirely up to you as to what to say regarding salary. Certainly you want to maximize your potential salary. But be aware that being too greedy can absolutely take you out of consideration, particularly if someone with equivalent skills is willing to take less. It's a game, it's a gamble.

    If you want, you don't even have to mention the recruiter, or that you know what the salary range is... you can simply say that you were looking to make from 16-20K. They'll think, "Hmm, cool, he's right in our range."

    Certainly if they come out and ask, "Did the recruiter tell you what the salary range is for the position?" you can answer truthfully that she did. What I mean is... you shouldn't be dishonest... but you don't have to lay all your cards on the table unless you are asked. ;)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  5. Leehaa

    Leehaa Gigabyte Poster

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    How do?

    Do you know, the most important thing is about personality - they need someone who is confident and ready to take stuff on - not sensitive to critisism and quiet.

    Probably the second most important thing is enthusiasm about the role, their company and IT in general.

    Boff all you want to as that also helps, but the above two factors are most important if it's a customer facing or telephone role...

    Cheers,

    Leehaa
     
    Certifications: MCP, MCDST, ITIL v3, MBCS, others...
    WIP: BSc IT & Computing, RHCE
  6. Queeg

    Queeg Bit Poster

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    Thanks for getting back to me so promptly.

    Fortunately it's not a telephone role, so I will do my best to come across and a good communicater, but I still don't think I would make the impresson of someone who would do well talking over the phone.

    I've written down a few insightful questions which might boost their confidence in me:

    1. What can you tell me about promotion prosects in the company?
    2. Do you encourage studying for Microsoft Certifications?
    3. Is there a particular operating system that you use mainly here?
    4. Would you say the IT part of this company has a postive outlook for the future?
    5. Do you have a close relationship with your employees?
    5a. (if they say yes) So would you say you get on well with them?

    Are these suitible questions do you think?
     
    Certifications: MCTS, MCDST, A+, Network+
  7. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I would swap them about, I would ask 3 first, then 4 & 5 then 1 & 2 because if you ask number 1 first they might think you dont really want the job and want to get out of it as soon as possible.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  8. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    Is this your first IT job? I know you mentioned entry-level, but I just wanted to make sure. Reading the questions, I don't think I'd use them in entry-job interview. Saying that, if you still want to ask those types of questions, I'd suggest you to take GBL's advice but also change the questions a bit.

    This isn't the order to use, just your list revised: (also, some questions may not make sense to use - depends on actual role)
    1. After about 2-3 years in the role, how does management feel about movement or promotion into other roles within the organization? What's the average employee churn?
    2. What is the company's view on internal and external training? Internal - working with other teams to learn skills to help you understand and perform the job/task better. External - meaning using training partners, allowing for time to do tests, etc...
    3. What are the main systems in use here? Is the company a Windows shop? What versions of UNIX etc... are used?
    4. How well is the IT team integrated with the business? Is IT in a vaccuum, or does it participate in Business decisions?
    5 - How well does the team work together? Is it a tight team, or do most people work on their own projects

    Good luck in the interview...
     
  9. Queeg

    Queeg Bit Poster

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    Yes this is my first IT job, I ended up asking him where he thought the IT part of the business would grow with the rest of the company and if they used primarily Linux or Windows.

    I don't think they interview went very well :(. He asked me loads of technical questions and I kept getting confused, I really struggled and I don't think I gave him the answers he wanted. When he asked me what I did in Network+ I just couldn't explain and I suspect he thought I was a braindumper because I couldn't answer a lot of his network questions. I even struggled to explain what was on my CV. The only part that went well was at the end when I asked him questions and then spoke more about the role itself. He said he had to review other candidates and would give me a call during the week if I was successful.

    Although maybe I'm being too pessimistic, I know many people have had interviews when they think they have done really badly but end up getting the job! Yet I still don't want to get my hopes up.

    Any thoughts
     
    Certifications: MCTS, MCDST, A+, Network+
  10. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Now you know what to work on for next time! :) That's why going on interviews is useful, even if you don't get the job... they let you know where you are weakest so you can fix those areas.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    What BM said…
    Don’t get stressed about one interview, instead use it to be stronger the next. Whether that’s a 2nd interview at this place or another opportunity somewhere else.
     
  12. Queeg

    Queeg Bit Poster

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    Thanks guys, I'm gonna apply for some places using the ones Arisen's suggested in his 'How I got into IT' thread. There's a job out there somewhere for me and I won't give up!
     
    Certifications: MCTS, MCDST, A+, Network+

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