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Non-unicode programs language options

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by dales, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    Hi all,

    having a bit of trouble figuring this one out, or at least finding a definiative answer. the non-unicode language is this for example, you buy a program from china or somewhere thats not written in english and its not unicode you set the language to china and it will display the program icons etc in english/chinese? This is also without the need to install any MUI's, LIP's.

    I struggle with my native language let alone learning somebody elses so never really fiddled with this option before.
     
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  2. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    dales,

    Saying "non-unicode" is like saying "non-Microsoft." So does that mean Unix/Linux, Novell, or other? Can you be more specific by saying what it IS (e.g. ASCII or EBCDIC) instead of what it is NOT?
     
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  3. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    to be fair I dont actually know, im just trying to figure out what this option does in xp pro, im studying for the 271.:oops:
     
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  4. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    dales,

    Which option in Microsoft Windows XP Professional are you talking about?
     
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  5. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    regional and language options the advanced tab, thanks for that.
     
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  6. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    dales,

    That refers to configuring Microsoft Windows XP Professional to be able to view, navigate, and enter data in the native foreign language.

    For example, if you go to http://www.yahoo.co.jp , you will probably get a lot of incomprehensible code and stuff.

    Now, install the language option for "Japanese" then go to http://www.yahoo.co.jp .

    You should notice in your second visit to http://www.yahoo.co.jp that instead of incomprehensible code and stuff you should now be able to view, navigate, and enter data in Japanese. How to use "Windows IME" is a separate lesson. How to read Japanese is also a separate lesson(s).

    See, once upon a time, ASCII used only 7 bits. That was enough for the basic alphabet for English. Then, EBCDIC used 8 bits which permitted more characters to include accents on letters. However, foreign languages such as Japanese, Korean, and Chinese needs a lot more than 8 bits to represent the various letters in their "alphabets." That's where Unicode comes in. Unicode in UTF-32 can use up to 32 bits. Unicode also standardizes how languages are presented on the screen. It standardizes like how a certain binary number will be translated to a foreign language the same way as long as both computer and server supports Unicode.

    I hope this helps.
     
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  7. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    Ah I see thanks for that!
     
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