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New to IT (hence the name)

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by NewBee, Mar 13, 2009.

  1. NewBee

    NewBee Bit Poster

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    Hi guys,

    I was wondering if you could give me a bit of advice. I'm 28 and I first started doing any form of computer training back when I was 16. I did a BTEC national diploma in computer studies and I found the course to be really poor, the lecturers were poor and it basically put me off a career in computing! After that I went back and did some A-levels and went on to do a degree in Business management. After finishing uni 3 years ago and now working for a bank, I've decided that I want to give an IT career another go. I've always had a passion for computing, I've done bit of building my own p.c's and wrote a couple of web sites but obviously I've got very little experience in the IT industry other than a weeks work experience 11 years ago!

    After doing a bit of research I was hoping to go down the route of self studying for an A+ and then the N+ and hopefully then on to an MCDST and maybe an MCSE after (depending on how things go). I've had a look into the course content and I think its the path I want to follow. My question is is what path would you suggest for getting into the IT industry? How would I be best gaining experience or do you think employers are likely to take me based on my (potential) IT qualifications?

    Thanks guys, sorry its so long winded!
     
    Certifications: BTEC National Diploma in Computer Studie
    WIP: A+
  2. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I'd recommend the A+, Network+, and MCDST, but no farther until you build some real-world IT experience.

    That said, don't wait until you're certified to start looking for your first IT job... start looking NOW. If you get the A+ before you find a job, add it to your CV and keep looking while you study for the Network+.

    Welcome to the forums!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  3. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Hi Welcome:)

    I agree with BM
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  4. loneferret

    loneferret Byte Poster

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    Must agree with BM, look now and study at the same time.
    Welcome aboard :)
     
    Certifications: MCDST/N+/L+/i-Net+/CIW/OSCP/OSCE
    WIP: MCTS 70-662
  5. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Hi & welcome to CF :)

    Same here :)

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  6. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Hello and welcome to the forums! :)

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  7. Jada Bloom

    Jada Bloom New Member

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    That was pretty much going to be my first question, though I'll give a little background first. I did an ultimately useless A level in Computing (alongside others) and then attempted a BSC in Computer Science for which I was woefully unprepared. I hadn't done enough research into the course and ploughed head on into it and hit a brick wall in certain areas such as programming, where I had only learnt via immitation during my A level rather than gaining a full understanding. This left me at a serious disadvantage and the sheer workload that accumulated while I tried to catch got the better of me. As such I was put off by the idea of an IT career and left the course, spending the next few years working out of debt.

    However since then I've regained an interest in the field, partially through building, setting up and maintaining my own computer and those of my family and friends, and I realised with that degree I had directed myself into an area of IT I simply wasn't enthusiastic about. Having done much research I believe something in the area of support technician would be a job/career I could really enjoy and apply myself to. That realisation gave me a positivity I haven't had in some time, having spent a few years feeling somewhat aimless and disconcerted about my future.

    My question is much the same as NewBee's so that's been adequately covered, though I'd like to know what sort of knowledge I'd need going into a CompTIA A+, whether it would be worth doing an IT essentials course of some type first. As I say I'm comfortable enough with hardware and software to build and setup systems and deal with a fairly large number of common OS, driver problems etc. I'd stop short of calling myself an advanced user though. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Certifications: None as of yet
  8. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    A+ is the starting point. If you're comfortable enough with hardware and software, you'll do just fine with the A+. Tackle it with confidence!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. Jada Bloom

    Jada Bloom New Member

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    Cheers for the advice. I discovered my local college have an A+ that involves only 4 hours a week in a class (along with plenty of home study, naturally) so I'll have to find out if it costs much/anything and possibly sign up.
     
    Certifications: None as of yet

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