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New old bloke

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by moremoneythansense, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. moremoneythansense

    moremoneythansense New Member

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    Hi All,

    A bit of a novel idea - introducing oneself anonymously. Still why not? I joined so that I could post/ask questions on here from others who have experience of IT training.

    I want to get into network management. I'm 46 now and am wondering if I might be seen as 'too old' by a lot of employers - especially since as a (to be) newly qualified MCSE I would hardly fit the 'graduate' category.

    I understand the posts that say that it is possible to be so emphatic about the possibility of a 'guaranteed' job in IT that one can delude oneself or ignore otherwise obvious warning signs (one of them apparently being that nobody can guarantee a job at the end of training). Nevertheless there is also a body of opinion on here that seems to say that if one is properly prepared and has an idea of the work involved, that buying training isn't such a bad idea.

    I've been working with computers for around 11 years although no formal qualifications. I started out in 2D paint and animation and taught myself 3D modelling and basic Unix scripting. Six years in PC games and went off on a different course. Four years running an Internet sales site and configuring and maintaining a very small LAN. I've done numerous installs of various versions of Windows and consider myself pretty good at problem solving.

    So despite the warnings and claims of rip-offs on various posts here, I'm seriously considering spending money on training. Anyone is welcome to comment on the likelihood of my achieving MCSE in three to four months...
     
  2. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Hi there and welcome 8)
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  3. phonetic

    phonetic New Member

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    My cherry is intact when it comes to working in IT, so I don't have anything to add.

    Why do you say three to four months, though?
     
    WIP: A+
  4. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Hi and welcome to CF!:)
    I very much doubt that you could achieve MCSE in 4 months, its not a simple course to pass.
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP, MCDST, AutoCAD
    WIP: Rennovating my house
  5. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    It can take around 3 months to pass one MCP to be honest. How much time are you going to allocate to studying?

    Also you say your networking experience is maintaining a small LAN, the MCSE covers some complex network topologies which take time to learn.

    Best of luck with your studies! :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  6. moremoneythansense

    moremoneythansense New Member

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    Thanks all for your posts thus far. Perhaps I should add a bit more detail:

    I am fortunate enough to be able to study full time. No wife or kids either - so I could in principle do the full eight hours classroom study and (yes, I'd be a bit brain dead by the time I get home) then fill the evenings with more study. I don't have to work so can devote myself full time.

    Thing is though - (rather obvious perhaps) it's only worth doing if a) it's realistically achievable and b) if the qualifications match the claims of the salesmen ie that it will suitably prepare me for the marketplace.

    From posts elsewhere on this site, and from this sort of feedback, I'm beginning to feel that I would be mislead were I to sign up and attempt to study full time for MCSE. The timescale was calculated by taking the length of each module (usually 5 days) adding a day for the exam at the end of each and then straight on with the next module with no delays in between. The sum of all these times was thirteen weeks. My 'provider' (no, I haven't paid or signed yet) has raised no objection or comment to my stated aim of going through the course in the shortest possible time.

    Of course I like to think of myself as capable enough - but then who doesn't? Thing is - a lot of you on here are actually at the place I'm aiming for, so some honest opinions (while they might cloud my rosy optimism) cannot be anything but good.
     
  7. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    All the best and welcome.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Hi and welcome to CF!

    I'm not a MCSE, so feel free to discount my remarks! However - I feel that even if you do it full time you will find it very hard to achieve it in the time-scale indicated. And when you *have* achieved it you will find that nobody will take it seriouly because of lack of experience in that area. Your other experience is certainly valuable and will help though.

    I'd take it a bit slower, and mix passing the various exams with practical work.

    I'm a good 10 years older than you and my experience is that good employers don't mind age as long as you can do the work.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  9. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Welcome to CF. :biggrin

    You've had some good advice so far, so I have nothing further to say! :biggrin
     
  10. Tyler D

    Tyler D Gigabyte Poster

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    Greetings :biggrin
     
    Certifications: A+,70-270
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  11. moremoneythansense

    moremoneythansense New Member

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    I've been reading elsewhere on here about home learning. I can see the use of hands on experience. If I wanted to set myself up at home (using the money I would have spent on the course) to implement and understand the core technologies involved in MCSE, what would I need to buy in terms of hardware/software/e-learning or books?
     
  12. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Take a read of this thread. Should answer your questions.
     
  13. moremoneythansense

    moremoneythansense New Member

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    Thanks again. Anyone able to tell me where you get to buy parts for three or four XP capable machines for £500? Or did I misunderstand that part?
     
  14. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Ebay :)
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP, MCDST, AutoCAD
    WIP: Rennovating my house
  15. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Or computer fairs.

    Also - have a look at your local rag (aka 'newspaper'). There are often ads for slightly older machines there.

    Also see if there is a FreeCycle group where you are - sometimes machines are given away via that route.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  16. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    That is a totally unrealistic timescale. When I embarked on the MCSE track, I was lead to believe, by a course salesman that I could do it in about six months. That was total BS. I was not a noob to IT, in fact I had worked as an admin for 7 years prior to starting the courses. However, in reality the subject material was much more complex than I was led to believe. Also, nobody mentioned at the time that the courses MOCs (Microsoft Official Curriculum) do not cover the topics in anywhere near enough detail to pass the related exam. It states this at the beginning of every MOC book. So you need to supplement the courses with a lot of self study and it is this self study element that eats up the extra time.

    Bear this in mind.. There are seven exams, which start off easy and get tougher as you progress. As has been stated 3 months to get ready to pass one of these exams is not unusual, some may be tough and take longer. For example the ISA elective took me nearly a year to feel ready. 7 x 3 = 21 months!

    I actually took me three years but I did go through study lulls, which I believe everybody does as *life* just gets in the way.

    So, in conclusion - I very much doubt that you will be an MCSE in that time scale unless you cheat. As we don't condone using braindumps here and as you seem like a decent honest guy from your intro post. It will take you the absolute minimum of a year, especially as you, like me are past your prime, learning does not get easier with age.

    Pete (51)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  17. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Welcome!

    Some good advice given above. 3-4 months is awfully ambitious... took me over a year to get mine, and I was working as a tech at the time, with my hands actually ON what I was studying.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  18. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    Wow PC games Hmmm.

    and achieving MCSE in three to four months...

    It could be done if you went to a Bootcamp. Like your name suggest more money than sense. But since you going the home study route it's a Mission impossible!

    Good Luck and Welcome to CF8)
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+

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