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Network Quesion

Discussion in 'Networks' started by dominoe, Sep 11, 2007.

  1. dominoe

    dominoe Nibble Poster

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    Im currently studying for the N+ but I has recently wondering about a few things with network ethernet wiring

    As I understand 10/100/1000baseT networks have a max cable lenght of 100 meters between a switch/router and the computer, meaning after every 100 meters you need an access point to boost the signal.
    What I was wondering where do patch panels fall into this, ie are they just an extension of the cable so you still need to plug into a switch/router to extend past 100 meters or do they also act as amplifers so to speak?
     
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  2. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    No - patch panels don't amplify the signal at all... they merely provide a point to join the wires from two cables together.
     
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  3. dominoe

    dominoe Nibble Poster

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    cool thx for the info
     
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  4. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    And the use of the term 'access point' is confusing - that term belongs to WiFi.

    A hub or switch is what you need to extend the reach of a network.

    Note that there is a limit to how many switches can be used like this.

    Harry.
     
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  5. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Harry,

    Could you expand on the last comment about the limitation of switches...
     
  6. dominoe

    dominoe Nibble Poster

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    how many switchs/hubs can be used like this ? :)
     
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  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    This is a little hard to pin down because it depends on the quality of the switches, and the precise mode they work in. The controlling parameter is the end-to-end delay in a collision domain - if this is too large then the network will misbehave.

    There is a fair amount of slack in real-life products, which make things even harder.

    Harry.
     
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