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NetBios ovr TCP/IP = disabled/no NWLink protocols installed yet can still axs shares?

Discussion in 'Networks' started by mjtibbs, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. mjtibbs

    mjtibbs Bit Poster

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    Hi,

    Ok, slightly confused here.

    I thought all file and printer sharing in windows was linked to Netbios.

    I am slightly baffled.

    computer 1 is hosting the share with following settings:

    netbios over tcp = DISABLED.
    no NWLink or other Netbios protocols are installed.

    computer 2 i am using to access the share.

    it has the same settings as computer 1.

    how come I can still access the share on computer1 when I have no Netbios protocols installed?

    I am directly accessing computer2 via internal IP on the cmd line by the way.

    Does the "Microsoft file and printer sharing" use a different protocol when on an internal LAN and no Netbios protocols are available or somthing?


    Thanks in advance.

    :ohmy
     
    Certifications: MCSA, OSCP, MCTS Config SharePoint 2007
  2. nicolinux

    nicolinux Byte Poster

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    Dns ?
     
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  3. stuPeas

    stuPeas Megabyte Poster

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    I always thought that NetBIOS was no longer supported for the bulk of a Microsoft network as from XP. In this case I would have thought that you were using IP and URI's. If you turn off the file and printer sharing, then this should stop any sharing (I think). :D
     
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  4. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    NetBIOS is an old protocol, used on earlier versions of Windows.

    Nowadays - with Win2k and up - NetBIOS is no longer used between SMB and TCP/IP. SMB sits directly on TCP/IP.

    So normaly on an XP box you *don't* enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP.

    (This is how I understand it - but Microsoft has always been confusing in their documentation of this I find.)

    Harry.
     
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  5. stuPeas

    stuPeas Megabyte Poster

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    Indeed, Isnt it supposted to be dangerous enabling NetBIOS over TCP/IP? Doesnt it allow an attacker access to your network??
     
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  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    As far as I know it is no more dangerous than SMB directly on TCP/IP. i.e. - very! :biggrin

    You should always make sure your firewall is good for the two alternatives.

    Harry.
     
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  7. mjtibbs

    mjtibbs Bit Poster

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    Hi,

    Yes, If I turn off file and print sharing, the share is no longer available.

    So am I right in thinking that it was using purely the SMB protocol which is tied into the "MS file and printer sharing"?

    if so, what protocol does it actually use to "transport" the data so I could copy files etc? does SMB have a transport protocol built in?


    @nicolinux I was acessing the share directly via IP only.

    Also, I beleive that enabling Netbios over TCP/IP does indeed make your shares available over the internet.
     
    Certifications: MCSA, OSCP, MCTS Config SharePoint 2007
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    The 'transport protocol' is TCP/IP.

    You need to to realize that OSI does not map exactly to the TCP/IP world - but is a good guide!

    SMB is above TCP - so could live in the session layer.

    Harry.
     
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  9. mjtibbs

    mjtibbs Bit Poster

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    Ok thanks .

    Im gonna fall back and try to fully understand the OSI model (its very fragmented in my mind)

    thanks all for the info
     
    Certifications: MCSA, OSCP, MCTS Config SharePoint 2007

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